Jan Cox Talk 0994

The Neural Revolutionist Never Takes a Real Break

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Summary

#994 Jul 6, 1992 – 1:17 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :32. People who think differently from you aren’t bad; but note that those who are bad, always think differently from you. 

Life is the original, unsolicited, mind-blowing answer which man must then compensate for by asking himself an unending stream of unanswerable questions. 

Audio-only: the Neural Revolutionist choice: be tired and say you need a break, or be tired and admit it. The Neural Revolutionist likes/does neither. 

“Right now” is never forever for the Neural Revolutionist.


The News

Putting a limit on what you’ll think about will do more for sanity than all the psychiatrists, drugs, and support groups ever dreamed of.

***

…and Kyroot relayed this item: One man’s claim to intellectual noteworthiness is that he’s written a book that it’d take you three years to read.

***

Being ordinary is like being in the world’s largest cult.

***

“Excess Fat (comma), Excess Fat,” is the new address one man has given his mind.

***

If you’ll accept the common, collective wisdom that life furnishes for man then you’ll have to believe in death; and after that it’s just a small step to sometimes feeling kinda depressed.

***

The attempt to “be yourself” doesn’t amount to much if that’s all you’re gonna be.

***

Just over that way a man said: “I hate anybody that could run-my-life.” Sentiments which help explain the wide spread dislike men have for governments and themselves.

***

Then Kyroot issued this health warning, ex officio: “Thinking along the sequential, logical lines as do any of your contemporaries will almost always lead to seriousness.”

***

In an attempt to keep his calendar, if not his life, in some kind of balance, this one man would feel depressed on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and relatively satisfied on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, and on Sundays he’d just sit and stare at his feet.

*** 

Gazing back and forth, in and out, just at sunset, one man sat and mused, “From whence cometh the variety of human life, but from our pants, or else our minds.” …(Sometimes he wonders if there’s a “poet in him.”)

***

As he began to explore and carve out paths of his own in areas outside the city, this one man finally came to think: “What is my task, but to make my mind a fit place in which to live.”

***

Not far from here at all an ole man told the kid: “Forget how the ordinary have misused the term, if a revolutionist was going to, ‘send himself signals,’ they’d be, ‘mixed signals’.”

***

Another of the “Proverbs Life So Insouciantly Discarded”: TIme goes slowly for he with a grain of sand between his cheek and his gum; slower still for he with a brick.

***

In an attempt to defend himself from the criticism that the show does not report sufficiently on how life — even when flamboyant — remains bland and safe, Kyroot passed along this recent item of related interest: There’s this one man who says he’s “On the cutting-edge of a butter knife.” …(A certain king once pondered: “To whom is the creative the most dangerous?: To himself? — to the Crown? — to his fellow subjects and the peace of the kingdom? — or, is the threat all just a delicious delusion?!”)

***

A visitor to the secondary world of earth bound man made this observation; “would seem there should be two distinct forms of philosophy: The one that merely takes note of how man is (criticism dressed up a bit), and the second which would be plans for a space ship.”

***

By the time the year had come around again, this one man could no longer decide which was worse: To feel bad, or to have others believe you caused them to do so. Moral for those not satisfied with “Morals-In-Mid-Flight”: It’s hard to be compassionate-in-a-straight-line if you don’t know about the curves that started the affair in the first place.

***

The twin, AC institutions of nationality and religion serve man — a creature now only partially driven by the herd — as a reassurance that whenever he does need one it’ll be available.

***

A certain rebel told his young cousin: “Men who want to know ‘where they stand’ want to know a lot! — (of stuff that’s useless, I might add).”

***

Crying, “Be forewarned,” the man stood with these words: “I operate only either by hormones, or by habit.” And all of his close personal friends shouted back to him: “Sit down, fool! — they’re the same thing!”

***

While out for a morning run one guy suddenly stopped and said to himself: “People who think differently than you are not bad — but note: Those who are bad do think differently than you.” (His mind scratched its own head and said: “Hummm — that presents a most propelling possibility.”)

…..and a woman in the audience sends this note: “My Good Sir: That brings up a quite interesting question itself: What is the greater distinction between people? — their behavior, or their thinking?” …(In some parking decks the blue vehicles are parked closer to the red ones than they are the yellow ones.)

***

Calling the class to order, T.A. Kyroot picked back up on the study of: “The Singularity Of Man As Seen Without The Aid Of Microscopes Or Telescopes”: Who but homo humdingerus can, by professing his total unworthiness, appear superior?!

***

Over this past weekend one of the speakers in city park had this message to deliver: “‘Making it’ in the secondary world is akin to climbing a ladder made of noodles.”

***

And now for Kyroot’s “Super, Duper, Oh-So-Obvious, I-Knew-That-Already” tip for today: You can’t be creative when mad,
Nor original when sad.
— (“See!, I told you I knew that already!”)

In the midst of his multi-pronged efforts to be: More of that he seemed to be; less of what he thought he was, and more able to recognize that there was no present distinction, this one man would sometimes privately refer to what was left-over-in-himself as, “That Singular, Magnificent Beast.”

***

Those who need a “broken heart” are those who sing of a broken heart.

***

Someone writes us: “I guess I appreciate what you’re trying to do with your programs, but I truly find life already too complicated to have to think about it any more that I have to. (And come to think of it, I’ll bet this is the biggest problem you run up against.) Respectfully Yours,” etc.

***

While back for a visit at home one lad said to this mama: “I read the sex act referred to as ‘the little death,’ and if that be valid then falling in love, based on sex, should be called to, ‘little disappointment’.” And rubbing her forehead his mother thought two things: “Where has this boy been? And, was I a victim of a mix-up in the maternity ward thirty years ago?!”

***

As far as books are concerned, one man says that all of the benefits he’s ever derived therefrom he got through reading the indexes.

***

More secondary sociology and other unnoticed stuff, as per Kyroot: When ordinary “old men” get in danger of actually becoming creative, their hormones suddenly wear down, and they accept “living death” as their natural condition. …(That’s when the next generation of the “kids” know it’s safe to come out.)

***

Over in one kingdom two subjects were sitting in an outdoor cafe talking, and one said: “Do you find it significant, if not metaphorical, that our greatest general died clutching in his hand the works of our most renowned philosopher?” And the other one answered, “No, do you?” And the first replied, “No.”

*** 

Everyone has several floors, and everyone has an elevator; whether they ever come into a meaningful relationship or not is another question. …(One man ripped the quotation-marks key from his typewriter; [He says his eyebrows may be next].)

***

While the king waited below, nothing happened.

***

A chap writes to the Advice Doctor: “Dear Doctor: Do men who believe they’re on a mission in life generally run on stick-shifts, or automatic transmissions?” (And the Doctor responds): Sir, I’m not really sure, but one thing is for certain — they’ll eventually try to get on your highway.

***

The human mind continues to devise a non-ending parade of unanswerable questions to compensate for that initial, brain-blowing, unsolicited answer.

…..many people have comforted themselves just so: “If I can stay distracted long enough, first thing you know I’ll be dead.”

***

Then Kyroot offered another example of how: “The Balance Of The Verbal World Stays Perfectly In Balance — Though It Would Any Way Even If It Didn’t Want To”: One man with a brain, a mouth and a tongue says: “Being only minimally civilized at least keeps one from being maximally uncouth.”

***

As he recuperated in Sick Bay they gave the young rebel the job of stitching together proverbs.

***

The Force in charge of handling requests for help and information from the local creatures in this one universe had a stock reply to all: “Think about it some more.”

*** 

Just before we began taping someone in the studio audience sent Kyroot this question: “What would be the difference in trying to be serious amongst-the-silly, and vice versa?” And Kyroot responded: “Now that’s my kind of — in fact should also be ‘your kind of’ — inquiry: But ask yourself this: Which is preferable: A cream filled hand grenade? Or, a Trojan Horse stuffed with actual Trojans bearing really neat presents?”

***

One city reminded some of its more serious subjects: “Remember: A sizable portion of ‘not-knowing-what-you’re-doing’ can be compensated for by telling others what they should be doing.” …(A voice cries out: “Which is the greater fun: A metaphor unexplained and unclear, or one ‘spelled-out-for-you’ and ruint?!”)

***

Annotations to another of the, “Primary-Secondary Worlds’ Short Symphonies”: The day came when dark clouds loomed just over the horizon threatening the very life of the kingdom; but by then the people had progressed to the point that they could imagine that the danger was twice what it actually was, and simultaneously say, “Screw the danger!”

***

Then Kyroot relayed: “A Story”: One man went through four stages: To begin with he had an “imaginary friend”: Then he became the “imaginary best friend”: And later he became his own real “best friend”; and finally he became imaginary. The End.
…(Well…some more voices did yell out: “Which is to be preferred: Metaphors we don’t understand that sound significant, or ones we do — which are thus rendered meaningless?!” And someone shouted back to them: “But you’ve already asked that!” And they yelled back, “We know! — but so what?!”)

***

He told some of those around him: “You can’t help the hormones you’re born with, but I still have to tell you that some of you have really backward ones; I guess the question is: What to do from here?!” …(Just because a man has a limp doesn’t mean he can’t play the guitar and tap his foot.)

***

More war news from the common intellectual front: Even soldiers dead — live, as they retrench their position, in our memory. (The just-born know not what to think ’til they spot friend from foe; while the rebel rises only after such notions are gunsmoke in the wind.)

***

Pulling up a soap box, and playing “speaker-in-the-park” to his own, “crowd-standing-around,” this one man had this to say to himself: “If you quit something you’ve been doing because you ‘came-to-your-senses’ you still ain’t got much senses.” …(And being apparently carried along by the flush of the moment, added this comment: “May I remind you of a most memorable Kyroot that says: ‘A rebel stops — the ordinary repent’.”)

***

To a revolutionist, secondary anger is not only a form of stupidity, but also an unintended form of praise, both for the target of your ire and for idiocy itself. …(One ole man made it simple for his kid: “Don’t ever hate anything you’re not gonna kill.”)

***

Although they do not comprehend it as such, most of the distracting glare men experience in their drive through life comes from their own tail lights.

***

One rebel told himself, “Say, look here Sport: You seem to have a choice: Either be tired and say you ‘need a break,’ or just admit you’re tired.” (And although he got the point of what he was saying, he still didn’t care much for the choices.) Based on the increasing complexity of his technical eyesight, this one man now refuses to accept the plural of a word as one of its synonyms.

***

A “young-turk” part of him said to an “older-part” of him: “It’s easy to be nice when your hormones start wearing out.”

***

Right-now is never “forever” to a revolutionist.

***

This one god thought, “What’s the use in having creatures if you’re not going to make them feel bad?!” And just as he was dying he finally had a real creative thought: “But then who created me?!”

*** 

And Kyroot added: Oh yeah, whilst we’s on that kind of subject: Over in another area was a certain god who said to the local creatures, “That’s ‘Mister god’ to you punks!”

***

And another viewer writes: “Although references to the revolution being perhaps some kind of ‘ultimate joke’ disturbs me greatly, I still, inexplicably, find the notion most captivating, but may I ask: If it were so, then would people like me be the ‘set-up,’ or the ‘punch-line’? …or worse yet — would it matter?!”

***

There’s also the, “Two, Talk About You Guys,” who’ll do just that — get right up beside you and “talk about you,” and never speak to you, or give any indication that they’re even aware of your presence. …(…and Big K. added: If the room wasn’t already so crowded I’d ask for a show of hands of all those who’ve ever run across these guys.)

***

One man told all his daughters and sons: “If you’re going to wreck your health, do it while you’re young — but be man enough not to whine about it when you get grown.”

***

…(Related item, continued from page 6): Since they were too poor to afford a baby brother for him, this one lad had a tumor instead.

***

Then right on anti-schedule Kyroot read from the “Fairy Tales: Book Blue”: Once a man approached a rebel and said, “I don’t know that it’d be any cheaper, but being on drugs would surely be easier than doing the revolution.” And the seditious one had to nod his agreement, as he mentally also added to the list — patriotism, religion, fear, and all manner of simplistic thought.

***

One man recently pondered: “Has there ever been a king who wouldn’t comment on his position?!…” …(And Kyroot noted: He’s not now that far from wondering if there’s ever been a king who wouldn’t admit to his position.)

*** 

From someone who says they’ve followed these television programs for some time now, comes this correspondence: “To me the proof that this neural-revolution-thing won’t really work, is the fact that religion still exists.” …(And Kyroot noted: At least he didn’t take up our time listing additional secondary activities that could reasonably fit his definition of “proof.”)

***

On the first day of class the professor said: “I know that some taking this compulsory Philosophy course are uncertain as to exactly what it is, but what we’ll be doing for the next semester is simply considering certain unanswerable questions, and unsolvable problems.” And a young man raised his hand and said, “But I’ve already done that myself.” To which the instructor replied, “Perhaps, but not under professional supervision.”

***

One creative ole man told the kid: “If you try to live your life by any of the many recognized philosophies available in the secondary world, even onto your deathbed you’ll always wonder —
‘Did I choose the right one?’ Whereas, if you pursue the
revolutionist’s course — (which has no alternatives) — you’ll never have any doubt! — even if you are still unsure as to exactly what it is that you’ve attempted.”

***

True creativity pleases most the creator.

***

And from our viewing audience comes this letter: “I find many of your ideas extremely interesting, but I don’t think this neural-revolution-thing will ever catch on with the general public unless you begin to engage in dogmatic statements about what people should and should not do; in point of absolute fact — I don’t see how it could be otherwise ever become popular.”
…(In a surprising post script the writer adds: “In fact, if you read this letter on the air it’ll be just further proof of how far you are from a potentially successful course of action. Sincerely,” etc.)

***

To try and do his part in bringing needed attention to the questions of “health” in today’s busy world, this one man says he plans to die.

***

The “glorious past” about which the mind so often speaks is in fact, forward, not back; for men do not actually think in past terms when they “think fondly of the past,” but are rather dreamily foretelling what better days lie ahead. …(Insofar as Eden-abandoned, and paradise-lost, the way back is forward.)

***

It’s hard to take ordinary life seriously and be a revolutionist…No, strike that — that’s not so; it’s not hard to DO, what is hard is after you’ve started doing it — is to notice it!

***

In our audience several people have wondered: “Is the neural revolution like a cure without an ill?” …(“Damn!”, exclaimed Kyroot in sham theatrics, “Is that not close or what.” [Sham, sham].)

…..– But, just to be one the safe side (in case any children or the weak might be watching), Kyroot decided to add to the proceeding, this comment: “The revolution is not, in fact, a cure for anything, since a real rebel is not sick — just impatient.”

…..Two lads were playing and one of them said: “The ordinary aren’t really stupid, but you’ve got to call them something.” And his pal replied, “How ’bout we call them later.”

***

…and Kyroot noted: It’s easier to be dumb in your own home town.

***

This one rebel began telling those interested in the ideas that he was from another planet — just so they wouldn’t begin to suspect he might be from another planet.

***

On this one world the only way you can tell you’re dead is that you get even dumber.

<END>