Jan Cox Talk 0988

Memory Is Not an Accounting, It Is an Argument

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Summary

#988 Jun 22, 1992 – 1:00
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :28. Memory is not an accounting, it is an argument.

The whole is more intelligent than any individual parts. The mind however cannot see that it is more intelligent than its thoughts.


The News

When life asks for a testimonial — everybody will give one; doesn’t matter whether you offer praise or criticism, it’s still a testimonial.

***

All problems divided by 3 are manageable.

***

One fellow believed that the “trick” — the “short-cut” would be to figure out which is the weirdest — the primary world, or the secondary.

***

And the rebel camp doctor noted: “Hormones don’t want to be alone.”

***

There are two things about a man who believes his own “I” to be the source of his intellectual life: One is, that he is normal, the second is, that he is incorrect.

***

Any time you’re hurt-but-not-bleeding (that is, pained-in-the-secondary-realm) remind yourself — “There’s something here that I’m not thinking about?!…”

***

And one rebel thought, “Boy!, when the pretense goes — it really goes!” …(“Hey!,” said one reality, waving its broom, “you get outta here, you old bad pretense you.” And quickly added, “Just kiddin’ — just kiddin’.”)

***

…and Kyroot, transparently “disguised” in some sort of stage costume resembling the archetypal city shaman, said: In the ordinary, folly is not overcome, but rather, crippled by age.

***

…and Kyroot noted: Waiting around to be creative seems to be the only way to do it, but if that’s the only way you have to do it — you’ll never do it.

***

After many years of study, reflection and experimentation, one man came to this conclusion: “Life is far too tricky to be taken seriously.”

***

Just after the soup was served the next speaker assumed the podium position, shuffled his papers, wiped some blue cheese dressing from his chin, and stated; “This evening I want to talk about the early to mid seventeenth century, an era from which we have not yet fully recovered…” …(This prompted a couple of waiters to engage in this sotto voce quiz, said one: “If history was sick where could it go to recover?” And his compadre replied, “Like for all other forms of the past, I suspect our own minds would play remedial host.”)

…..and within the bat of a cable operator’s eye, a viewer contacts us: “That notion just mentioned, that history might could somehow become ill is disgusting! If this were possible then each person’s individual knowledge and memory would be far less reliable and certain that it is now — that is, less than we think it is now, …which is the same thing, …I’m sure you’ll agree.”

***

One man said, “The best protection is self protection.” “Yeah,” added his partner, “and the same with self.”

***

Turning to his younger apprentice one god said, “In this business there are two most important rules; Rule Number One: Never tell anyone every thing you know.”

***
…while a guest at a rebel cook-out Kyroot mentioned to those sitting around after supper: Whenever it’s one of those times to pay up life for one of its bills — don’t wait around for change.

***

“You wanna know why people like fiction?”, said one ole sorehead, “you wanna know?, well I’ll tell you why people like fiction: People like fiction ’cause they can’t stand their own lives! — Simple enough!”

***

Pulling the lad slightly aside, one ole man had this advice for the kid, “If you must think about others make them the subject of the sentence, and if you must include yourself, at best let you be the part following a preposition.”

***

Memory is not an accounting, but an argument. …and Kyroot said: The music that moves the parade of secondary progress is cacophony.

***

The man with the side-show described his proposed new act thusly: “If human thoughts are like bullets — then fire away! And I’ll catch the minds of others in my teeth.”

***

In his home waters even Neptune doesn’t know what will happen next. …(Thus, although no one asked me, is contained the unrecognized limits of all knowledge, including scientific.)

***

One day a king advised a prince: “Never laugh at how the people look; that is their privilege to use against you.”

***

Tales & Torted Truisms From A Third Reality: Milk was originally spilt so that men would learn to cry.

***

And the mails brought in this letter to the Advice Doctor: “Dear Doctor: Would it be fair to say that all of the tales of adventures, expeditions and challenges that men have concocted throughout the ages are in truth subconscious metaphors for his own desire to grow and expand internally?” Dear Sir: I don’t think so.

***

After he’d wandered away from the rebel camp for a considerable and unplanned amount of time, this one man sat down by a stream in the late afternoon and had this mental scene present itself: “There are actually two forms of the revolution: First, is like a kiddie version, when you first begin and believe that absolutely any thing is possible — and then the grown up version.”

***

A visitor to Earth commented: “It seems to me that the real job of what you call religion is to make men take life too seriously.” “Oh no,” replied his host, “that’s the job of civilization.”

***

And a viewer writes: “One of the things I think I especially enjoy in your shows is when you’ll mention something that’s real important in life, and then show how it’s really not.”

***

As they strolled along an ole man told the kid, “You can forget all those old adages alluding to men wanting their cake and eating it too; it’s really more like men wanting to cut their finger with an old knife they have which they didn’t think was still capable of such damage, and not having to have tetanus shots afterwards.” …(“Okay, boys and girls,” said the teacher-nanny, “everyone who wants to go to Jupiter and stay at home don’t bother to raise your hands.”)

***

…and Kyroot observed: One man says (and not without some justification) “It’s hard to go against your hormones.”

***

What ordinary intelligence can never grasp or remember is that a combine, a locomotive, or a computer always knows more than any of its blades, wheels, chips, or other component parts. (Of course, once you understand the systemic structure of the human mind, you realize that perforce, it could not be otherwise.)

…..Follow-up corollary: If the mind knew what it was, it would no longer be the mind. …(In the above sentence you may place the modifier, “ordinary” before the two appearances of the word “mind” for yourselves; …[And you may also, unilaterally, jolly over the alternative possibility which would be the original birthday of a revolutionist’s thinking.])

***

The primary world is not made to “wait,” while the secondary made up the concept.

***

The crowd listened as the man addressed them, “Poets and prophets have forever proclaimed, ‘This world is not my home — is not my friend,’ and I ask you, is this not astounding?!”
…(A gentleman in the audience punched his nephew in the ribs and asked, “Did he say astounding?, and if so, what do you think he really meant?”)

***

The “heroism” of the future world is always in creativity.

***

In another universe was found a page from someone’s writings that said: “The neural revolutionist is like a man who, one by one, kills off all of his old friends.”

…..There was once a man whose mind was like a comfortable old chair, stuffed with memories, certainties, and other supporting materials.

…..Mental stuff that a person might get on their own, outside the acceptable ideas of their time, is the only knowledge (Cf. the metaphysical poets) that does not lead to tears.

***

And from out-there comes this viewer correspondence: “Based on something you recently mentioned, using politics as the example, of how it’s always just a struggle between those in power and those who want to be, my brother and I have to start two new, competing religions: ‘The Five Word Religion,’ and ‘The True Five Word Religion’ whose operating names will be: ‘It’s Time For A Change,’ and ‘There’s No Substitute For Experience’; once we’re set up and running good we plan to do all of the things natural to a religion: We will argue, threaten, and wage war on one another, and (god willing) grow and flourish same as has man’s mind under such conditions.” Signed, “Sincerely, Me & My Brother.”

***

And M.C. Kyroot made note of another of the Great Cosmic Door Prizes: It’s hard to dance alone, yet damn near impossible to dance with others and still see what the dance is.

***

One of the elements missing in man’s attempt to postulate a Unified Field Theory for this universe is the Law Of Criticism.
…(On a more personal level: Not taking this principle into account can also fuck up your own mind.)

***

The revolution’s audience is what it is… not what you think it is, nor should be. (Weird, huh?!) …(And a sergeant-with-arms said, “Say! — who’s in charge around here anyway?”)

***

When the ordinary talk about art they speak of things that might free them from themself. …(A lad asked his dad, “Is that what makes discussions about art sound so curious?”)

***

…and Kyroot said to some troops: Protecting yourself has nothing to do with harming others.

***

Two guys were talking, and the first one says: “A man who’ll say ‘never’ is an imbecile.” And the second one asks, “How about someone who’d say, ‘absolutely’?” “Also idiots,” replied the first. And the second guy says, “Well how about people who’ll say, ‘I’?” And the first man interrupts the flow and asks, “How long’s this gonna run on?” And the second guy replies, “I’m not sure — how large a dictionary have you got handy?”

***

The Whisper Man (still safely lurking and living in the alleyway) sends this little message: “Most city mystics haven’t had a good meal recently.”

***

As the game of progress got well into the second inning, men on the field began to quickly realize, “Civilization is too sticky a sport to try and play without a glove.”

***

…then Kyroot, dressed up apparently as some kind of “historian,” said: Custom is civilization with its fly zipped.

***

A man writes to the Advice Doctor: “Dear Doctor: Is it possible to get the revolution too confused with the passing conditions of your own personal life?” Dear Sir: Yes, and this is a symptom of its terminal stage in you. “Dear Doctor: I don’t understand.” Dear Sir: Good!

***

Those most alive, even in the ordinary sense, still try to drive both of their cars at once even though civilization tells them they were issued the two by mistake, and that they should give up one of them, or merge the two, but by all means — quit driving so fast. …(On the physical level this is all pretty simple and obvious, while as regards a rebel it is just simple.)

***

…and it sounded like Kyroot said: It is every rebel’s duty to see that the revolution doesn’t ever begin to show its age.

***

And a viewer writes: “In regards to a man mentioned earlier who said that the job of civilization is to make man take life too seriously, might its purpose instead be to make life itself too complex?!” Dear Viewer: Nice try, except such a possibility is not possible. …(The left lung asked the right lung, “Do you think air is becoming overly complicated?”)

***

Resting quietly under the eaves of his house one chap thought, “If it weren’t for my hormones I believe my mind and I could actually get along.” …(A cricket sitting nearby tried his best to give an encouraging smile.)

***

No matter who or what you are, why would not a man think to himself, about another — “I wish I could help.”

***

And yet another ole man told yet another kid (regular viewer’s program note: Same kid — same ole man): “Lad,” he said, “if you do have to talk to yourself about what-kinda-guy-you-are, at least use a fictitious name when you do it.”

***

What the religious are want to call the soul is but that undiscovered part of the mind, always just up ahead.

***

Just as he passed you on the side street the Hey Man had this to convey, “Hey!: Either age does bring wisdom, or else the older you get the less able you are to recognize stupidity. Hey!, but either way.”

***

When you can’t breathe you can’t think, and with a revolutionist, vice versa — especially, vice versa.

***

Primary pride is in the spine — in one’s posture; secondary assurance on the other hand, is a wee bit less direct. …(A kid said, “I’m not even going to bother asking my ole man if that’s why there’re more weight rooms and tracks than there are libraries, and concert halls….[as if it makes any difference].”)

***

Another man who has been watching our show sends in this letter: “I seriously believe that this neural revolution you talk about would be much more popular if it was more involved in telling people what to do exactly.”

***

…and an apparent Kyroot associate remarked: “For inspiration intellectuals look to the past, poets to their feelings, kings to their treasuries, but who the hell knows where a revolutionist looks!”

***

Near a busy downtown street corner was a man handing out small cards that read, “Feelings can hurt you worse than any thing.” And after reading this, one passer-by wrote his own message thereon and handed it back to the man (it said): “I wouldn’t be too sure of that.”

***

Whenever he looked the revolutionist found the get-well cards stuck to the ceiling.

***

Those who believe that quoting the ideas of the revered can be an indication of their own superior intelligence are like a man who’d kill the king and eat his heart just so he could say that they were “acquainted.”

***

One day an ole sarge looked out over the troops in his charge and told ’em: “I know all of you are enjoying this, and yet some times I think we’re attending two different dances.”

***

A viewer writes: “I have tried hard to think about the ideas I’ve gotten from your program, and tried to even feel what it might be like to actually put them into practice on myself, and it seems to me that to try and do this neural-revolution-thing in the midst of one’s everyday life would require that instead of blood in one’s veins the revolutionist would have to have warm ice-water.” …(And at the bottom is a “P.S.-aside” to Kyroot: “Would this letter have been as insightful if I had actually written it myself rather than having had you write it for me?”)

***

There is only one thing that should impress a revolutionist — originality.

***

And from the rebel’s log — “Nefarious Nautical Lore”: A ship that won’t sail off the edge won’t sail.

***

Since no one could explain it to him, this one lad studied the matter of deities on his own, and came to this point; “The idea of god is the hope that you won’t die, and that you’re not as dumb as you seem to be.”

***

Then unexpectedly this one man suddenly thought, “You know, in a funny kind of way the revolutionist is the only person who can afford to not be serious about life.”

***

The power and beauty of the new thinking of the revolutionist is not in its ability to overcome ignorance or routine thought, but is in its survival in him, in face of the latter’s overwhelming strength.

***

A man with a limited number of shirts finally instructed himself thusly: “These are the ‘A B C’s Of Human Existence’:
A: Just as the changing seasons drive the caribou, so do the
shifting conditions of a man’s personal life dictate his
direction;
B: Living solely by the conditions life presents will make a
man miserable;
C: Everyone is more or less miserable;
D: I want to be a revolutionist.”

***

The neural revolution could be considered the archetype of the “hopeless cause”; yet the rebel will fight on to the inevitable end.