Jan Cox Talk 0900

Only a Revolutionist Can Change and Refuse to Acknowledge It

PREVNEXT

Summary = See below
Condensed News Items = See below
News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-06-26 -0900
Transcript = None
Key Words =

Summary

#900 * Nov 27, 1991 * – 1:00+ 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :30. The Neural Revolutionist can only seek freedom that would be possible (while knowing no freedom is possible in a finite world), i.e., in the here-and-now vs. tomorrow-in-your-dreams. Man’s natural and proper world is non-free at the PL/Primary Level, while at the SL/Secondary Level can think otherwise. The ordinary mind, in thinking (of the non-finite landscape), creates its own finite landscape in order to survive; it creates its own living-space. Only the Neural Revolutionist would try to get the better of himself; to change and then refuse to acknowledge it.

Epilogue, 1:00 to 2:16—who can face the near impossibility of change? Just to accept the impossibility of change and not give up puts one in an extraordinary position. The Neural Revolutionist does not care, for or against the truth that freedom to change is impossible. Refuse absolutely to tolerate non-physical pain (negative emotions); indulging in same would be the worst thing a Neural Revolutionist could do. Either think about something else…or don’t think about it at all…or do whatever it takes to settle the issue forever.


The News

There was once one man who began all of his sentences in just about the same way he planned to finish them.

***

The reason the old intellect prefers to deal in “goods” rather than “services” is that it’s easier to get a refund with the former.

***

One guy named all the parts of his body but one. (Hey! — is this a “trick” question?).

***

A Certain ole man advised his kid, “The secret to inner-secret, revolutionist popularity is that whenever they say, ‘Welcome to the club’ — get the hell out.”

***

And from our, FYE department, (For Your Encouragement), formerly known as the, HSCYB bureau, (How Stupid Can You Be), comes this reminder: Only those who live in River City can have troubles “right there.”

***

Whenever he would approach the reclining dog to offer some affection, the canine would arise, and ofttimes the man would say, “Ah, you didn’t have to stand up,” and the dog would think, “Tell that to my genes.”

***

Those standing around glassy-eyed at the station can, if questioned, always tell you where they’re going.

***

{…one of the really great things about riding life’s collective bus with the rest of the gang is that you can rejoice therein, you can curse the fates that brought you there, you can refuse to admit your own presence, and you can even jump out a window. …What a trip!!}

***

“Son,” said the guy who was, in truth, his uncle, “Son, remember: You can’t keep a good man down, unless you’ve got two or three better ones to sit on him; then it’s a whole other hog ride.”

***

One of the king’s philosophers, making a private, personal appearance over in the goo park said, “Some things in life are important, and some are not, and the most important thing to remember is that no one can tell the difference.”

***

{…in some neural neighborhoods, if the crowd don’t kill you, they may give you a hand.}

***

As a few have suspected, well beyond their years, the history of everything but uncertainty is quite dubious.

***

A recent story making the rounds concerns a new religious group over in another galaxy who have taken a new approach by adopting the slogan, “Watch Your Feet.”

***

Another of the Fables You Can Count On Like Taxes: Inside of every bug is an elephant.

***

Do remember that even though the secondary’s name for things can never be wrong, it’s still just “its opinion.” (There was once a man on your planet who said he hated it when the unexpected made sense. …Well, that and the over-expected.)

***

With a certain insistence he now insists: “I have taken far too much crap off of my relatives to ever be nice to me again!”

***

Freedom discussed is freedom forsook.

***

Words some have tried to live by: “Never stand up on a bus, or speak loudly in a turkish bath.” (At one distant time, men had this backwards.)

***

Question, joke and tetanus shot combined: What is the single largest source of human irritation and disappointment? — people believing that what other people say is meant to be taken seriously.

***

Only a whole new area of the brain can go from one place to another and never look back.

***

{…without a full-swivel cranium, human emotions are problematic. …(…and a viewer writes: “Perhaps I’m from the ‘old school,’ but I do enjoy it more when people say like, ‘Without a full-swivel cranium, human emotions are IMPOSSIBLE,’ rather than the less dogmatic and certain, like with ‘problematic.’ I feel sure you know what I’m talking about, because sometimes you do both; [but I just wanted you to know which one I like the best…(and I bet I’m speaking for a lot of people out there)]. Yours Entirely,” etc.)}

***

In revolutionist goo-fields — lightning can be a lateral affair.

***

To help foster family unity, this one ole man had a coat of arms made up for the clan that centered around a painting of a coat without any arms; he then told all of the young’uns that anytime their peers started to comment on their unusual ways they could just point to their indicative heraldry.

***

City-Intelligent-Person’s-Faking-It-Tip: To appear astute when you don’t know what you’re talking about, end on a note of irony.

***

For a ship to stay afloat on secondary seas, it must continually look at itself, and think about buoyancy.

***

The local god of one reality finally agreed to “cure” the creatures of their secondary ills, but only if they could prove the existence of the ill. (Guess what, Bunky?!!)

***

One guy’s operational slogan is that, “Words that aren’t spelled like they sound don’t mean what they say.”

***

The Minister Of Intellectual Smartness And Stuff gave his son a telling kick and cried out, “Hey, you little pig-sniffler, don’t be whinnin’ and giving me that ole crapper-roonie; the only kind of evidence we got around here is anecdotal! —- You better wise up quick.”

***

The city says you should think about some things, and not about others. (Boy! — does the city ever have your best interests at heart!)

***

{…one chap, of the struggling sort, says he thinks of his own mind as a large discount store with many of the departments temporarily closed.}

***

{…upon hearing the word, “temporarily,” his brain when into a momentary laughing spasm.}

***

And from a viewer comes this letter: “In your numerous stories regarding, ‘The Ole Man and The Kid,’ I sometimes can’t tell which one is supposed to be the smartest.” (And sometimes sir, neither can they.)

***

When some realities don’t know what they’re doing it’s just their creatures’ imagination. (No, I’m not going to tell you “a-damn-gain” that this has nothing to do with the way your old, civilian intellect works. No, no, no!! …[Huh? — did they buy it?])

***

Just as a “young-man’s-game,” one lad began to call his inner emotional voices, Fat Al Capone, and his disinterested thoughts, The Untouchables.

***

On the one hand, the most fun you can have is on the primary level; but on the other, this is only true if you don’t question it.

***

In finite realms, Captain Irony operates in such a manner as to cause men — even when at their best — to always look over their shoulder. (“It is good,” said Tit, “for man to be alert.”: “I do not,” said Tat, “consider abject embarrassment a form of alertness.” …[Hey! — what’da two guys with names like those know!])

***

According to one borscht-belt-theologian, the world’s first “prat fall” was that opening act’s tumble from Eden.

***

One man’s motto was, “Short and sweet,” which his brain said was fortuitous, inasmuch as that was also a shimmering description of his mind’s capacity. …(And a viewer — speaking for many, I’m sure — wants to know: “What kind of man would do a thing like that?” …[And the fair knight, Sir Stand-Back declared, ‘Why, kind inquirer, should we deal in generalities when much less will obviously do?” (At least he had the politeness not to say, “At least in your case, sir”)])

***

{And to some,/ the convoluted/ seems to be ill suited.}

***

{…having arrived at the theater late, one chap’s neural processes offered in its own defense: “I have the eye of an Annie Oakley and the trigger-finger of a falling-down drunk.” (Give that man an aisle seat.)}

***

After a nice little visit, just as he was leaving, this reality left his mortal host a present which said, “Remember: Everything you believe is I-N Y-O-U-R M-I-N-D.”

***

One chap offers this social/intellectual tip, (gratis, I might add), that if you’re not especially smart, keep the lights low.

***

To tell exactly “what” your reactions are not based on is a devilishly subtle way to slip in what-kinda-guy-you-are. …(Why you sly dog, you.)

***

One, as yet, undiscovered tribe has a myth that says, long, long — “Hey — long” ago, the primary world told the secondary, “If it ain’t broke — break it!”

***

One rebellious “head-of-the-house,” took all his kids into the back yard, lined them up, and addressed them thusly, “Being alive and being human is indeed an entangled affair, filled with complexities, uncertainties, and more inconclusiveness than Saint Assisi could shake a stick at; but remember this — it still isn’t serious enough to get serious about. Troops — dis-as-MISSED!”

***

{…one viewer’s would-be opinion on this matter is that it would take a “special” kind of parent to ever tell a child anything like that. …(A chap in the studio reacted by saying he was proud to live in a land where you don’t have to take other people’s use of modifiers as a matter of momentous urgency; [I could see that the viewer’s use of the adjective “special” applied to “parent” hadn’t gone down all that well with him.])

***

Item, regarding the Neural Revolution: some local realities resent being talked about like this. Item: Fuck those realities!

***

As they were cleaning up afterwards, the fourth baseman told his younger brother, “If you think ‘the truth,’ and, ‘final score’ are forever, just look what happened to pinball machines after came video games.” (Would you pass the soap please…)

***

As a pet, one guy kept a closet door.

***

For a while, to help compensate the collective for “being the collective,” they launched new city buses by trying to break a can of beer across their bow.

***

The benefits of proverbs on the provincial is like that of rain-on-rocks. …(The reason “words of wisdom” strike such a familiar note in men is because they secretly know they’re meaningless.)

***

{…in the secondary world, “putting a name on something” won’t help much, but it’ll help a lot.}

***

{…to the older, ordinary intellect, anything that is “helpful,” helps; but you know better — right, troops?!!}

***

{…”I reckon,” mused one chap, “you’d have to ask yourself, ‘Helpful to what ends?’,” and therein, (all you non-coms), lurks the forever distinction between living-for-the-company, and being intellectually self-employed.}

***

In a fit of ill temper, one local god suddenly blurted out the admission, “Okay! — ‘so what’ if things aren’t really as bad as they seem?!!!”

***

A viewer writes: “Dear Kyroot: Inasmuch as the metaphorical messages of your epigrams and stories are themselves most excellent models of ‘self-evidency’ in the psychological and philosophical senses, I have taken it upon myself to explore their more pragmatic possibilities, and I would therefore appreciate the opportunity of running at least one of my thoughts by you for your reaction as to how I am succeeding in this effort. To wit: In your recent story about a king who instructed his troops to, ‘never shoot a man who has just taken a laxative’ — is this a comment on our need to conserve our natural resources? Sincerely,” etc.

***

After announcing that he would no longer insult any but “close kin” he seemed to become aware of the benefits of “brotherhood.”

***

One chap says, “Yes,” he can now see talk as a legitimate human hobby, and says he can especially appreciate it when people don’t do it.

***

On the “secondary bill” — even those apparently alone — are a part of a “two man act.” …(“Bring on the clowns! Bring on the monologists; bring on the tumblers and the elephants!” — “Hey, it’s me over here; we ARE on!”)

***

Trying to run a show from the sidelines is all they teach in city school.

***

One guy changed his name……………………….he said it was cheaper than trying to move.

***

Throughout history, many men have played with words; many men have been eaten alive.

***

In his earlier days, whenever he had a question, this one man would ask a question; then later as he got better at it, whenever he had a question, he’d think a question.

***

One guy stuck around just long enough to find out that he didn’t want to stick around.

***

After surveying the history of his own thinking thus far, one fellow thought, “If a post-mortem is only possible on the dead — what good is it?” (Ye gads! What if a man could learn from his own mind the same way life can dance with itself using your feet, and you, none the wiser for it?!!)

***

In his climactic grasp for fame, he applied for a copyright on stupidity.

***

To save his contemporaries the time, this one little kid began to “tell on himself”. He found this S-O-O pleasurable that when he grew up he started a religion.

***

One man now tells us that the more he watches our show in his mind the less he likes where he fears it is headed.

***

Another example of the secondary world working at a kind of “extreme efficiency”: situations, wherein the instructions for a task become so extensive that there is no time left to actually do the task.

***

{…and a young man asks: “Yeah, but what does this have to do with the way my thoughts work?”}

***

One guy realized, “Several people have tried to imitate this, and you know what — if you knew how, it’d work!”

***

Outside — very much outside — city confines, one guy’s best partner killed him, and, “Thanks so much,” said he.

***

{…the only way respectable thoughts and points of view can stay alive is to want to stay alive.}

***

Ideas That Can Save You A Lot Of Time And Money: Never hold a large duck, or a man who’s about to be shot, in your lap.

***

From one view: Man is held captive in the secondary world by speech; thus it must be talk that would free him therefrom — Correct? — No, not correct.

***

Over in another universe, just to the left of where you’re standing, they have one punch line for all their jokes — “Unnatural hardship.”

***

One man says that after years of self study, he is now sure that history was named after him.

***

Sub rosa item: The closest thing to anything “sacred” in the secondary world would be, silence.

***

Cliches, “the truth,” and conventional-wisdom, are to thinking as the collective is to itself. …(The kids in one neighborhood had a game they played, they called, “If rutabagas put you in prison, which food group will get you out?”)

***

{…and in an intramural update: one man said, “I can fool some of me all of the time, and all of me some of the time, but I can fool all of me all the time when I remember what I’m doing.” (He then smiled confidently, making many of those around him uneasy.)}

***

In not infrequent situations, the only way the ole man can instruct the kid is to drive him away from home. …(Oh yeah, this should have been labeled, “Neural Neighborhood News.”)

***

Only those supported by the secondary world must seriously reciprocate.

***

{…one guy’s rear-end told his ass, “Hey, cover me, and I’ll cover you.”}

***

{…if the square root of nine, and three could defend one another, the ambiguities of a finite landscape would become much more subject to a stable survey. …(Might I add, however,)…}

***

In the wonderful world of camouflage, “seriousness” remains the creme de la creme.

***

One king asked his subjects, “Would my important pronouncements make more sense if I suddenly just stopped in mid-sentence?”

***

{…and one of the ole village soreheads threw down his head, kicked it up against the wall and wailed, “A parable or metaphor that’s not explained can’t be understood; and one that gets explained ain’t worth nothin’.” (Then he kicked that sucker — Man! He kicked that sucker like tomorrow might be a holiday!)

***