Jan Cox Talk 0847

All Facts Arise From a Collective Process

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News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-02-25 -0847
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Summary

#847 Jul 26, 1991 – 1:00 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :15. Religion and science are polar extremes of civilized intellect and are the fruit of the collectivizing of individual intellects. Individual intellects don’t know what to think/believe about being alive whereas groups of them, thru the process of interaction/debate can embrace everything in the spectrum from religion to science, i.e., from belief to scientific thought. The startling impact of a Buddha or Jesus is in their individually knowing of what to think about being alive, the purpose of life and what is proper behavior.

Know-nothing man, collected into groups is know-something civilization. All Secondary Level World ideas come from collective thinking, not otherwise. E.g., Institutional, formal education is collective thinking; all facts arise from a collective process. Only the Real Revolutionist can be civilized w/o the restraints of enforced group behavior.


The News

We open tonight’s program with a Semiofficial Policy Statement from the Home Office: “If you feel reasonably satisfied and comfortable with your present hobbies and interests, such as worry, anger, cynicism and self-pity, then you probably do not need any of this,” (and now, on with the show).

* * *

Stick with the life of two opinions, ’cause one of them’s bound to be yours.

* * *

While out for a walk, one guy thought, “Man! — if all you have is liver appeal, it must be hell to lose your liver.”

* * *

On many a morning, he would look in the mirror and say, “Oh no, you don’t, I’m not that kind of guy.”

* * *

And from a viewer comes this inquiry: “Is there really any difference between a place and a person?” — Zounds! The next thing you know, they’ll be asking if there’s any difference between the time something occurred and what occurred.

* * *

This one race of creatures used to complain that their god always treated them in a patronizing manner, and one Thursday, he finally said, “I know what you mean, but it’s either that way, or no way at all; even I can only do what’s possible.”

* * *

(Oops! — hate to tell you, but better you hear it from me than from one of those tacky “not me’s”): If you seek for maturity in your art, you search for disaster.

* * *

There’s a secret parking lot behind all realities — but, Boy! Is it hard to find!

* * * 

The cousin of a squirrel doctor who used to live near the university offers this hint (hints he): “Whenever you reach a point where you clearly do not know what you’re doing — act like a foreigner on a secret mission.” …(Anti-moral: There are possibilities that will clear up damn near anything, but in the city are few who will give up their face for the sake of acne reduction.)

* * *

This one god says that some good, solid consumer research shows his best potential market to be among his own creatures (and a local king said he could’ve told him that).

* * *

This one revolutionist had to finally concede that his drug of choice was himself.

* * *

When you write and do only your own material, you can always have the punch lines. …(And a letter from a viewer asks: “Is the preceding actually a valid show biz tip, or just another one of those crummy metaphor things that you hint should be applied to one’s own individual mind? — Unsigned.”)

* * *

According to one fellow, he began to fully enjoy the
beauty-of-the-wilderness only after he began to look upon nature as interior decoration taken outside.

* * *

There is a place where insults are stored to ripen.

* * *

Cosmopolitan Supplement: If, in the city, you haven’t lost it by the age of fifty, you probably didn’t have it to begin with.

* * *

One guy had a sorehead for a partner. He tried to get in the Guiness Book of Records — they laughed him out the door.

* * *

While, to the linear mind, conclusions would seem to spell success, it is yet the lack of conclusions, certainty and finality that keeps this mind on the path to triumph.

* * *

Only the true revolutionist can be “civilized” all by himself.

* * *

A viewer writes, “Sometimes I think you’re just being silly, then again I think I’m being silly for thinking that, and then at other times I think I should be watching that cooking show on Channel Four.”

* * *

Of what good are any instructions away from those who taught them?

* * *

In the healthy, artificial — I’m sorry, I meant to say, in the healthy, healthy secondary world of man’s mind, the following Unknown Law unknowingly applies (if you know about it). This law states: Knowledge amplifies ignorance. …(The moral to this law could be that there is no end to such laws and morals — see?!)

* * *

One man’s best friend died on him — he did this almost daily.

* * *

To the revolutionist’s mind, bad news is never actually as bad as it sounds. …(Okay, I’ll admit that he may have an alternative definition of “bad”…even of “news.” Now that I’ve said it, does it make any difference?)

* * *

Year after year — into the thousands — did they faithfully confront the relentless, invisible challengers. (Civilization be thy name, man, thy game.)

* * *

One guy decided he wanted to be a poet; then he decided he wanted to be a metaphysical poet and deal in symbolism. He began to compose long epics, writing about the sea, barren mountain tops, and large empty rooms. He did sort of become famous — famous for writing — literally — about the sea, barren mountain tops, and large empty rooms; at first he was disappointed — until he found out how well even this kind of famousness paid.

* * *

A viewer who signs himself as “Mr. It” writes and says that his mental faculties are so gigantic that on aerial photographs, they show up as large, uncharted lakes.

* * *

After attending a lecture on “Modern Morality,” this one chap said to someone in particular, “Man’s ‘inhumanity to man’ is matched only by the indifference with which two treats two for the sake of obtaining four.” (A terrifying gang of local thugs suddenly leaped from an alleyway and for no apparent reason, beat this man to death. Game For The Day: Figure out the moral to this story without any help from Captain Irony or his kin.)

* * *

While on an errand in the city, a chap stopped me and asked, “If the law is to protect the weak, then is thought to protect the dumb?” …(Questions like that can make one late for appointments.)

* * *

Over in another zone’s a god who says what’s neat is when you’re sittin’ around with some of the guys having a few, and you say, “Hey, let’s all get old real quick and retire,” and someone says, “From what?” and you have the biggest laugh of all.

* * *

A certain ole man told his kid, “If nothing else, at least ‘turning ideas on their heads’ may make ’em sick.”

* * *

Perceiving what appeared to be (shall we say) a slight disparity between what he thought and what he thought he should think, this one man faced himself as squarely as possible and then thought, “So, is this it? I turn out to be a
slap-in-the-face to everything I believe in?”

* * *

One man always had his best thoughts on Friday — that was the day he went out of town.

* * *

I here have two letters from viewers that I’d like to read. The first one says: “Dear Kyroot, you don’t fool me for a minute.” The second one is from the same person and says: “My first letter wasn’t true, but I do so hate to be fooled.”

* * *

This one king would periodically remind his ministers, “Hey, I didn’t get where I am today on my good looks or intelligence.”

* * *

One guy could laugh at everybody’s problems but his own — what a guy!

* * *

There’s this one man who says if he stops for a moment to reflect on the possibility of gods, kings, or anyone being superior to him, that it gives him the “serious willies.”
…(He says he doesn’t do a whole lot of reflecting.)

* * *

The limits of change are not directed by dimensional conditions, but by man’s intellect. But man’s intellect is conventionally limited by dimensional conditions.
…(and Kyroot fablized: Far away in another reality, a man made the greatest telescope his universe had ever imagined; but little use it had — it wouldn’t fit anyone’s eye.)

* * *

One ole man pulled his kid over and issued the following advice citation: “Son, if you stop at every yield sign, and give way at every stop sign, not only will you get home safe, sound, and on time, but you also won’t care.

* * *

“Help,” went up the cry in one neural kingdom, “Help! — one of the revolutionists got off his leash — Help!” (Of course, it was all just a little joke, heh, heh. …[Moral: “Joke, my ass!” This, of course, has nothing to do with the story, but is a leftover that needed to be used.])

* * *

For his final act, this one god took a hint from Hollywood and used, as background music for that momentous climax, the song, That’s Entertainment.

* * *

A bunch of viewers got together and sent along this gang letter: “We can handle institutionalized folly and threat, but you, sir, you should be taken off the air.”

* * *

In secondary secret the revolutionist says, “I do not need protection,” (then adds) “and even if I do — I don’t want it.”

* * *

If it weren’t already so late, it’d be funny.

* * *

There was a man who was so impressed with himself that he was forced to state, “The only thing standing between me and total, complete perfection is other people’s opinion of me.”

* * *

As they passed in a secluded hallway, the prince asked his father’s Minister of Religion, “Sir, do you think our glorious afterlife will be a place where disturbing events never occur, or a place where they are never reported as news?” And the cleric simply smiled and went on his way as though he had not heard the question.

* * *

While everyone was forced to stand around and wait, this one guy secretly waited twice as hard.

* * *

Oh, here’s an important announcement we’ve been asked to make: “The man who invented ‘Morals-To-Stories’ has left the building.” Thank you, and now back to the program.

* * *

And yet another letter from the viewers’ mail pouch — a gent writes: “On your last show, you read a letter from my brother, who asked you if a neural revolutionist might just be someone who’s harder up for a hobby than everyone else, but being older (or at least, smarter) than my sibling, I’d like to propose a more direct variation of this question to you: Is it possible that a revolutionist might just be someone who is less worried than everyone else? Sincerely yours, Smarter Brother,” etc., and so on.

* * *

This one rebel got so good at it that sometimes he wouldn’t even tell himself what he was thinking…(and remember — I’m talking about a person who doesn’t have one of those sub or unconscious minds.)

* * *

The best way of doing anything is the way it is presently being done — unless you’re a revolutionist and don’t like it.

* * *