Jan Cox Talk 0846

Groups Can Think What Individuals Can’t

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News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-02-22 -0846
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Summary

#846 Jul 24, 1991 – 1:00
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :23. The question “why is man alive” is in incorrect form. The intellect’s purpose is to measure, test and record and to discover/distinguish what is: true and functional, and what is false and dysfunctional (always w/in a time frame). Its purpose is also to announce its likes and dislikes. The intellect is for measuring, testing and recording what is true, functional and likeable, and what is false, non-functional and unlikable…always w/in a time context. This is the job of the individual intellect.

The job of collections of intellects (civilization) is to do the same, but groups can think/believe things that individuals can’t. All humanity collectively represents the ultimate human intelligence (knows all that can be known), but note that any half of humanity at any given moment is wrong about any given subject (i.e., is in charge of being ignorant) and they are required so that the collective intelligence can be the ultimate one as just defined.


The News

One of the prime overlooked, or at least, underrated hobbies
in life is in simply having someone else tell you what to do.

* * *

By way of a tune-up, this one guy would periodically pull
himself into the garage, look directly at himself under the hood
and say, “Well? What’d you expect!”

* * *

There are quite physical laws totally controlling the
actions of everyone except you and me (and at least twice a week,
your exemption is invalid). …Oh, did I forget to mention this
is from our Specious Humor Of The Day department?

* * *

In a buoyant attempt to save the big bucks, this one chap,
when he found out he needed glasses, began to talk louder.

* * *

One fairly ordinary king said, “The best reason for fighting
for this position is that once you’re here, you can treat
everyone else pretty much like dirt,” and he was asked, “Is that
the truth?” and he replied, “Well it sure seems that way.”

* * *

All city rebels are fifth columnists, though half of them
never know it: This is no censure of those “civilized
subversives,” but is rather a medical notation of the
mathematical health and dynamism of the secondary territories.

* * *

There’s this one guy who has silly hand gestures for every
day of the week (and two for Thursday).

* * *

A man writes us who says he’s never written us before.
…But he says “Now — all of that’s ruined.”

* * *

Now the way it looks to humans is that many places in the
Three-D world would like to be somewhere else.

* * *

One guy says he’s riding the Blunder Train; He says it’s really pretty neat,
because since he’s not going anywhere,
it doesn’t matter where he gets off.

* * *

Although the source has been long and properly forgotten,
the proverbial phrase, “Nothing is ever wasted,” was originally
an advertising slogan of the utility companies.

* * *

Although it was within his power to do so, it was not
within his power to say so.

* * *

They don’t put safety-catches on god’s guns. (…and Kyroot
added: Oh, yeah, another self-identified, “Divine-type-viewer”
writes in in support of an earlier complaint that we too often
use their profession as a mere metaphor or symbolism for “God
only knows, what else.” ..[And yet, “Oh yeah” again: has anyone
noticed we don’t get such grouching from, say, lawyers,
accountants, or bus drivers.])

* * *

Okay, I know I promised to remind you, so here it is again:
Ordinary human knowledge is all anecdotal, and thus, subjective,
self-centered, unstable, unreliable, and meaningless — just like
it should be!

* * *

Giving a shiver, one region of one guy’s neural kingdom
said, “Neutrality is toooo cold for me.”

* * *

(Ah, injustice, where is thy sting?): While searching for
his roots, this one guy spilled a whole bottle of hair color.
…(Oh yeah, regarding the question, Injustice, where is thy
sting? the answer is — everywhere!)

* * *

to this and tell me what you think it says: ‘Experience is the
Great Instructor.'” And the ole man replied, “But you must
remember that man matriculates in two worlds — the primary and
the secondary, and that the background of those who teach dance
and those who teach accounting are not and cannot be the same.”
The lad rubbed his lips a bit, then said, “You do realize that
the thrust of your response belies, or at least bedevils the
apparent original intent of the idea,” and the elder replied,
“Well, you asked me — not the proverb.”

* * *

To help narrow down the field of potential choices, this one
chap, as a matter of principle, decided he would have no interest
in any god who didn’t ask for money.

* * *

Not only is the world big enough for everybody, and not only
is there enough cake to go around, but the Home Office is busy
enough that everyone is employed.

* * *

Another of those wired-up, unruly field-theory-sets: If you
don’t look around, you can’t get around; if you don’t look
around, you might fall down; if you don’t look around, you’ll
stay in town; and, if you don’t look around, you’ll miss the
clown.

* * *

Stepping out into the crosswalk in front of the waiting
pedestrians, he waved his hands for silence and stated to the
startled strollers, “A man who merely has a list of important
ideas he plans to think about is not the same as a man who does
not have an electric blender,” and someone shouted, “Well, no one
said he was,” and the man shouted back, “Well there you are!”
…(The Metaphor Council would like for me to make public note
of their contention that were it not for their efforts, much of
what’s funny wouldn’t be funny. …[Now I gotta ask you: Is the
principal responsibility of city institutions information or
self-defense?])

* * *

And a city in our viewing audience writes in to say, “I
don’t really want to get embroiled in the argument over using gods
as metaphors, etc, but I do feel obliged to point out how common
it is for the deities to take credit for work we’veù produced.
Thank you for your time,” etc., etc.

* * *
A ruler with “nothing to hide” won’t have nothing to hide
for long. (Okay, the seasoned version): A ruler with nothing to
hide will not long be in the position of being a “ruler with
nothing to hide.”

* * *

One of the park philosophers bellowed, “Great thinkers are
great thieves,” and a chap with a brown bag in the crowd replied,
“If we’re talking about those who ultimately proved to be ‘great
thinkers,’ then what they originally stole they took from the
already impoverished.” (And the bag shouted, “Hear, hear!”)

* * *

One fellow said he favored the “one syllable approach,” and
when the critics questioned his stance, he said, “Intercourse
yourselves.”

* * *

“Under certain conditions,” one voice noted, “fake
enthusiasm is better than enthusiasm at all.”

* * *

What if there is some subversive place, some radical way
in which a learned ability, an acquired talent, is superior
to a natural one?

* * *

From our vast viewing audience comes this letter, “Dear
Kyroot, etc: Beyond all the vagueness and convolutedness of all
this, might it be that the revolutionist is just harder up for a
hobby than everyone else.” …(Someone check the postmark on
that envelope.)

* * *

In an attempt to break out of the stereotypical, deific
modes of communication and to give such messages a more “folksy”
flavor, this one god tried sending down his directives in these
words: “Big Ed wants changes, and he wants them now!”

* * *

Over in a summer camp that was neither primary nor strictly
secondary, there was a kid whose best friend hated him (and he
was much more thankful than he wants me to say).

* * *

than no secret at all.” …(After reflecting on this but a short
bit, he added, “Hell, it’s better than any secret at all,” and
walked away happy.

* * *

The mayor of one city had a little motto of his own. It
went: “it’s alright not to pay all of your bills — we’re all
charged for more than we ever use.” …(Uuu! I thinketh I smell
another threatened communique from the Metaphor Council…Watch
yourselves.)

* * *

One kingdom had a minister in charge of Hot Stuff. The king
admitted he didn’t know what it meant, but said he really liked
just knowing he was around.

* * *

Reflecting back on the manner in which his own intellectual
development had occurred, he groaned, “I am a victim of self-
service.”

* * *

If you must give more than three examples of anything, then
no number will be sufficient.

* * *

In case you’d like to know what’s currently considered funny
amongst the Big time, Inner-Cosmic Crowd, the latest joke
crackin’ up all the assistant deities is this one: “What does
god call the period just after a day of calamities, catastrophes
and upheavals? — The next day.”

* * *

One man refuses to accept any diagnosis that did not come
from him, and he says he’s not qualified to give one. …(And
the little Squirrel Choir rang out with that inspiring hymn, “Well
I Guess That About Wraps It Up, Sweet Sweetgum.”)

* * *

One city replied for itself, “Look, if you don’t take
yourself seriously — who will!”

* * *

would ball them up, throw them out in the mud, jump up and down
on them, then straighten them out as best as possible and send
them on their way. In this manner, said he, the recipients could
have more to “think about” than just the breathtaking brilliance
of his words.

* * *

One man’s pithy comment for the day was (pithed he): “The
only way to be truly happy is to not be happy in little
spurts.” He admits he doesn’t know what this means, but he says
that’s alright, neither do you.

* * *

And the mail system here at the TV station brings us this
letter from a viewer who says: “Is it your intention — through
the sheer quantity of your ideas — to completely overwhelm our
sense of sequential logic and expectations?… “Hey! — I think
we’ve got a mis-delivery here — this must have been meant for
that cooking show on channel four.

* * *

Any reality that can talk about another one cannot be far
from the one talked about.

* * *

One guy used to try and look up his own dress.

* * *

Oh, and one more contact from the chap over in the office of
the Metaphor Council. He asks if we can’t at least run some
Public Service Announcements for them, since they’re now an
official organization “with a slogan and everything.” Well, I
guess I could give that out, it reads like this: “Metaphors —
Safe As Milk And Half The Butterfat.”

* * *

As he browsed in the nonfiction section, an important
looking book said to a guy, “Just think, if you knew everything in
me, what a better person you’d be.” The human pondered this for
a moment, then replied, “But just think, if you knew everything
inside of me what a hit you’d be with all the little girlie
books,” to which the hardcover responded, “I initiated this
conversation with you on a high, intellectual level, and now just
see how you’ve brought it down to a most crude one.” And the guy
said, “Do you wanna get laid or not?” and the book said, “Well,
sure!…”

* * *
A traveler with a hatfull of suspicions doesn’t need a shoe
size.

* * *

Becoming downright adamant and beginning to bop and weave
about the supervisor’s desk, this one man hissed, “I am more and
more convinced that my life is being put together from stock
footage.” …(There was little that immediate reality could do
to calm him down — as if it tried.)

* * *

A viewer stopped me on the street (to save the postage, he
said) and kind of whiningly confided to me that although he found
our programs quite interesting, his brain was already so full of
thoughts that there wasn’t any room for anything else.

* * *

One guy says he’s now really beginning to wonder what it
would be like to really be himself. …(Another attractive
detail of man’s binary modes of existence is that what tastes
like oranges in one world can still look like them in the other.)

* * *

Being ordinary is no crime…(and even if it is — there’s
no way to prove it).

* * *

One city said, “If I did not fret so much in concern over
thy love and faithfulness, my time would pass in greater peace,”
and its reality replied, “Ah, but fretting does so become you.”

* * *

Seeing a genealogy chart, one guy asked, “Would it be of
real value to know where you came from?” and a subversive voice
replied, “Would it ever!” (But quickly the voice added, “Oh, I’m
sorry — I thought for a moment that you knew what you were
saying.)

* * *

In some realms — lack of interest speeds the aging process.

* * *

do, but which he knew would be good for him — or whenever he was
about to do something he wanted to do, but which was not good for
him, this one guy would always say the same thing, he’d say,
“Well, I’m going to go ‘boil my guts.'” In that way, he said, he
couldn’t tell the difference!

* * *

On one of those kinds of days, one kid asked his ole man,
“Is there somewhere a program actually spelled out wherein it’s
specified which one of us should be initiating these
conversations?” and the elder replied, “Yes, but like so much of
everything else around here, by the time you find it — you don’t
need it any more.

* * *

There was once a king who had two sons. To one he said, “If
you realize you don’t know what you’re doing — act kindly,” and
the other one he told, “If you don’t know what you’re doing —
lash out.” (And in this kingdom, all went well.)

* * *

Beyond the grunt-and-sweat level, a revolutionist’s real
family is — what he knows.

* * *

And a final letter from our viewing audience — a man writes
and says: “Kyroot — if you’d ever combine all you know with
being pissed, you’d really have something.”

* * *

Question: What’s the difference between entertainment and
instruction? Answer: If you think there is any — you ain’t
gettin’ one or the other.

* * *

The reason why this is so much fun is simple.

* * *