Jan Cox Talk 0842

All Stories of God Must Be Adulterated With Anti-God Troubles

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Summary = See below
Condensed News Items = See below
News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-02-13 -0842
Transcript = None
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Summary

#842 Jul 15, 1991 – 1:00 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :17. Monopolies strike humans as obnoxious. Deeper basis: monopolies represent a coming too close to the thwarting of the necessity of polar functioning of 3-d world. Thus men must pretend to love god. All stories of god must be adulterated by trouble with some anti-god. Humans are thus always allowed an escape from absolute monopoly.

Only a Real Revolutionist would be an instigator, a participant in a non-win/lose game in a polar reality. Man’s intellectual world is based too, like the Primary Level World, on a win/lose basis. Only the Real Revolutionist can impersonally realize this, and knows this arrangement is not man-made. Ordinary intellect denies the arrangement on the basis that it can think it is otherwise.


The News

There is a certain controversial reality that has no plansù
to change.

* * *

There are two varieties of history: the forward and the
backward.

* * *

Whenever he needed help, this one guy, instead of asking for
help, would ask for advice. He was one of the most popular guys
around.

* * *

Due to a quirky clause in his contract, this one thinking
creature would only be impressed by any other thinking creatures
during months that had no “e” in their name.

* * *

Look sharp — a man with a pocketful of excuses could be
your local expert.

* * *

Pushing at the very limits of secondary expansion, this one
chap named his latest book “The Unexpected Connection Between
Mathematics And Sex.”

* * *

A sorehead’s definition of heaven: “A place where only your
enemies mistreat you.”

* * *

Around here, things continue to operate as conveniently as
possible, and man remains one of the more favorable labor-saving
devices.

* * *

Once, when he heard a speaker denounce the “conspiracy of
silent acceptance,” this one fellow thought, “Boy, is he
kicking the wrong rock; the only real acceptance is silent
acceptance.”

* * *

but, my god! — what an act!”

* * *

There was this one king who had an underling worry and cry
for him. He said were it not for this, he’s not sure being king
would be worth the bother.

* * *

This one guy says he refuses to be taken seriously.

* * *

If for no otherù readily conceivable reason, a real
revolutionist would want to “escape — make a break for it” just
for the sake of a good run.

* * *

Whenever he had no law or facts to support his case, this
one celestial attorney would plead his cause on the basis of
“justice and mercy,” which always brought out a bunch of the gods
to watch and have a good laugh.

* * *

An alive human being who’ll feel guilty’ll feel damn-near
anything.

* * *

The eleven-fifteen spot in the speakers’ place in the park
was being filled by a newcomer who had this to say: “My friends,
mankind has yet to fully realize the extent to which all of his
thoughts, behavior and senses are connected — just ponder the
normally overlooked precious nexus between sight and smell.” The
crowd looked a bit stunned by this, so he added, “Well, just
consider the nocturnal bathroom habits of hippos…”

* * *

If you can think of more than three uses of human language,
you might be able to think of the one.

* * *

A fresh equation: New Ideas = The Urge To Change
…(Well, what else could they be!)

* * *

is that you can usually get laid,” and a king sitting nearby
muttered, “Rats! I was gonna say that.”

* * *

Being ordinary is being limited to where you are, who you
are, and stuck with a One-Lifetime-View of things.

* * *

One ole city guy says that if society would “get with it,”
and begin to criticize the sick as vigorously as they have the
smokers and the drinkers, we’d soon see a lot less illness.

* * *

Where Mary meets the Lamb, the lightning strikes the goo.

* * *

Reality never fails.

* * *

The prince says, “Short stories are the best stories,” and
the king says, “No, short stories are the shortestù stories,” and
the queen says, “How many times I gotta tell you notù to correct
the boy!”

* * *

To help keep the bonds of affection alive, this one chap
used to write to all of his friends from out of town — even when
he wasn’t.

* * *

One city “thought god”, (maiden name, Merchant), said, “Hey,
you gotta think about something — why not give me a whirl.”

* * *

One guy’s left hand would glow in the dark, and although, as
per the instructions, he didn’t tell anyone, it still didn’t
happen.

* * *

One ole sorehead’s bon motù for the day was: “No man is so
friendless as to be without at least one companion who will tell
him how downright disagreeable he really is.”

* * *
One guy suddenly believed that if he ever had the world’s
greatest thought, it would be his lastù thought… (But then he
told himself — “Not to worry.”)

* * *

If you must look to another ordinary human for intellectual
comfort, you might consider this — that you were born in a
straight-back chair, and it is there you will finish out this
ride.

* * *

Just having a “positive attitude” won’t get you far in a
bullet factory.

* * *

I don’t guess it should come as any real surprise, but it’s
reported that some of the squirrels are now refusing to be
quoted.

* * *

When it would appear that his creatures had reached an
impasse and were at a loss as to what to do next, this one god
would urge ’em on with the cry — “Plagiarize, damn it,
plagiarize!”

* * *

Just to help you keep your story straight, remember: You
can’t feelù like you’re “nothing,” but you can thinkù you feel that
way.

* * *

After a particularly demanding night of portraying himself
in the secondary world, he studied himself in the bathroom
mirror, and concluded that he looked like a person whose
intellect had fallen from a great height.

* * *

The best message must reach the fewest number of people.

* * *

In a landscape where shadows take precedence, the edge may
be near.

* * *

six o’clock curfew): For the first forty years of his life this
one guy only thought about things that men had already
thought about — (after that, jeeze!; who knowsù what happened to
him.)

* * *

There was once this one king who wouldn’t kill anyone while
other people were watching, so he traded all of his in for a
whole new batch of blind subjects.

* * *

One of the coffee klatsch opined, “No matter what is said,
just after the title page –allù books are dedicated to the home
office.” And one of his companions sipped and said, “Ah yes,
words — thoughts frozen.” (And this from one with creeping-
noodle-nudeness, who claims his toupee is solelyù to keep his
brain warm. [There was another party present at this
conversation, but his libation had become so tepid he was loath
to participate].)

* * *

If it’s not initially invisible it’s not new.

* * *

Hey — this one guy was so sure of himself that he didn’t
even bother to show up.

* * *

One chap says that while he continues to remain uncertain as
to just what all of this is about, he does wish to somehow still
participate, so he’s decided that for him and his posse the
watchword will be: “Hey, let’s be serious when we’re sureù it
doesn’t matter.”

* * *

One man now says he finds the present to “waver too much to
be of any useful interest.”

* * *

All monopolies seem obnoxious, thus everyone pretends to
like god — (those that pretend to believe in him, that is).

* * *

always based on a temporary lack of competition.

* * *

The wide array of the city buffet is that you can live
closer to the bone or closer to the menu.
(In Act Two, Scene Two, the tenor’s opening line is, “I hate
to eat and run,” to which the soprano answers, “then let us
discuss the meal, then take a leisurely stroll.”)

* * *

In one place, this one guy was paid to make up stories.

* * *

The temptation to settle down with what you already think is
similar to the drive that made wandering prehistoric man stop
and set up permanent, more comfortable communities, and
conditions; thus was civilization born, and thus did man’s
intellect take on it’s necessary domestic qualities.

* * *

By the time he’d decided to land for a return visit, the
small airfield had become unrecognizable.

* * *

There was once a king who was alone, and he decided to use
his powers to create a kingdom for himself. But just as he was
about to bring it into existence, he realized he would also be
simultaneously establishing a royal court, from which he could
never leave.
What would you do?
(Least you think this tale too far removed from your own
reality, consider it as a retelling of how the human intellect
grows.)

* * *

Due to the characteristics of polar-based energy, human
thought is normally exclusionary in nature.

* * *

Whenever this one band of intellectual explorers would go so
far in one particular direction that someone would announce “The
end is in sight,” someone else would shout, “Screw the end!” and
off they’d go in new direction.

* * *

passed, this one reality said to its creatures, “Okay, you get on
top for a while.”

* * *