Jan Cox Talk 0827

Sweet Aroma of Factual Instability

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Summary = See below
Condensed News Items = See below
News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-01-11 -0827
Transcript = None
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Summary

#827 Jun 10, 1991 – 1:00
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :15. All facts finally fail—turn out to be less than advertised—which is their design, so that they can be replaced by new facts. The Factual World can change, giving the “real illusion” of change; the Actual World cannot. The intellect is constantly on the alert for new words and phrases. Such psycho-babble gives the palpable feel of change and is the absolute sign of Secondary Level World health. E.g., intellect tying time into Secondary Level World “timeframes” of history (“innocent” 50s; “rebellious” 60s; “me” 70s, “greedy” 80s, etc.).

Consider what might be stronger, acts or facts? Note: murder occurs much more often on basis of Secondary Level World motive rather than Primary Level World one. Ah, the sweet aroma of life alive, vibrant, healthy via factual instability!


The News

A child of this one reality would volunteer for anything as
long as it didn’t require his participation.

* * *

One fellow’s contribution to civilization’s storehouse of
contemporary wisdom (contributes he): “Exercise is easier if you
can’t count good.”

* * *

Changing your name may keep your old creditors at bay,
but it can’t stop them from extending you new entrees into debt.

* * *

You can die publicly — or privately.

* * *

One ole man’s manly advice to his younger-man-self-or-
aspect: “Son, if you ever find that your best expectations have
curled up, crawled under the table and gone to sleep — either
send out immediately for some new ones, or else kick them lazy
bastards till they jump and whine for joy.”

* * *

Declining the drugs and the booze, one guy noted — “No
morality involved, it’s just I’m dumb and dangerous enough
without any outside assistance.”

* * *

By the time something is famous and familiar — it’s
generally too late.

* * *

He ran excitedly into the house of all his other selves,
and leaping with joy, exclaimed, “I have decided that resisting
temptation is my second most favorite thing in the world.”
…(They all joined hands and did that little dance that people
like them like to do.)

* * *

In spite of the fact that no one reads it, in one place they
continue to publish it.

* * *

The elder voice told all the little ones, “Now once we
are in Primaryland, I want you all to enjoy as many of the basic
rides as possible.”

* * *

A new theology college in another reality told students
they could think and teach anything they liked, so long as they
didn’t take it seriously. …(Enrollment was not what was
expected, and the school closed four hours after it opened.)

* * *

The revolutionist is unimpressed by failure.

* * *

During the waning hours of the Feast Of Saint Obvious, the
king noted to his dining companion, “Were it not for my
adversaries, my reign would collapse.”

* * *

I would like to expand one of my recent offerings that noted
if you thought about something more than twice in this one
reality, it was yours. Do understand — it becomes yours whether
you later say you wanted it or not.

* * *

Just as the discussion seemed to have taken a reasonable
track, and a gratifying conclusion appeared near at hand, a man
stood and announced that he was Damn Near Astounded — and a
quick vote among the delegates revealed their agreement that his
was the most unusual name they’d ever heard.

* * *

To the consternation of many tourists (and not a few
residents), the city’s religion erected a large gothic, neon sign
that said, “There Are No U-Turns In Heaven.” …(The convention
of Ambidextrous Ambiguosities has already cancelled.)

* * *

To be useful to a revolutionist, any metaphor must actually
be a metaphor for some other metaphor.

* * *

As the toasting continued, and it fell his turn, the
Minister of Important Information stood, raised his goblet, and
declared, “Ah, my friends, I am intoxicated by my own mere
existence.” And the Queen muttered to His Grace, “I’m sure we
all appreciate the bargain of entertaining a cheap drunk.”

* * *

After hearing of related attempts, this one chap tried to
simplify his thinking by suddenly stopping his sentences right in
the…
(Well, more or less.)

* * *

The Blues: brought back home, then run back out again:
“when the train pulled up, everyone came walking out.”

* * *

One guy drove out of town real fast, then called back
home real quick — just to see if he was still there. …(Was
going to entitle this as “A New Approach” — but I didn’t.)

* * *

While rigid restraints remain in the natural world, you
might care to file under “Flesh Is Flexible & Man The Ultimate
Accommodator,” the following item: though a forty-five shell
won’t fit into a thirty-eight chamber, it will into a thirty-
eight-regular.

* * *

After some years of reflective self-study, this one chap
said to his reflection, “If I weren’t more trouble than I’m
worth, then I wouldn’t be worth anything.”

* * *

When it was time to stop, this one god just couldn’t seem
to. …(So much for that!)

* * *

One somewhat surly sort suggested to his younger
companion, “If you can get just the right spin on not caring
about other people, then they won’t care about you.” …(The kid
discovered it wasn’t all that tricky to do.)

* * *

There continue the apparent struggles and contests between
the city’s thinkers and doers, with no conclusive victor save
Life (and a random revolutionist here and there).

* * *

Sports: an attempt to put acts in a factual setting.

* * *

The purpose of man’s secondary world is exploration —
not destination.

* * *

Every really new thinker is his own private revolution,
secret cult, subversive system, and unruly uprising. …(But the
least you can do is keep it quiet.)

* * *

Some genetic archeologists say they’ve discovered a
heretofore unknown religion, the only evidence of which is a
surviving copy of their holy book, the name of which seems to be
“Some Interesting Stuff A Guy Made Up.” …(I might add that
the life span of this group about equaled that of the theological
school I told you about earlier.)

* * *

“Watch out!” the elder cautioned the kid. “When they
start havin’ fun some people expect too much.”

* * *

When this one guy didn’t know what to say next, he’d have
the music swell.

* * *

Last month, over in the city near the east plaza, a man
told me he’d concluded that a serious part of god’s attraction
and fascination is that he causes man to wonder if he didn’t just
invent the whole idea. …(This morning I received a note from
this same chap who says he now suspects that this may apply even
more so to consciousness.)

* * *

Okay, then ax yourself: If you’re not overacting how do
you know you’re acting?

* * *

One of the king’s more decorated neural patterns — no,
no, let me say, one of his more decorated generals — after
hearing the term, `unarmed civilians,’ thought, “What a total
waste of a perfectly good adjective — all civilians are, in
some way, unarmed. That’s what makes them civilians.”
…(Theorem collaterum: The witless and tiresome needù no
protection…okay — the stupidù need no protection.)

* * *

As the testimony subsequently revealed, the last thing many
remembered before the plane went down was the plane going down.

* * *

The speaker, presently holding the high ground of the
detergent carton, waved his sudsy arms and bellowed: “Commitment
without direction is like going somewhere and not knowing where
you’re going.” And a chap in the crowd thunk to himself, “If he
were to ever calm down I’d ask him, `What’s wrong with that?'”

* * *

While they were slipping up behind him, so was he.

* * *

Flash! — we interrupt our regular programming to issue
this important announcement: “Captain Irony, calling Captain
Irony! Do not — repeat — do not bother to call home. Some
people who intended to burn down your house, succeeded in doing
so.”

* * *

Every time things would reach a critical point of
seriousness, this one guy would laugh; needless to note that he
was never elected, appointed, or even considered for any public
office.

* * *

On the report card, in a space next to a near-failing grade,
was written: “This boy knows just enough history to be
dangerous.” And after the mother had read and explained it to
the father, the ole man said, “Well hey — let’s see’f we can’t
get a title match between the kid and this history guy.”

* * *

From the ground shrubs near the door a hand would reach
out, and make a single grasp at his ankles, every morning as he
left for a walk.
* * *

Just because you’re dying is no reason to be unhappy —
unless that’s the only reason you got.

* * *

Whenever he was accused of anything this one rebel would
shrug, and say, “Whatd’ya think?”

* * *

There’s nothing wrong with any idea — unless it
doesn’t work.

* * *

After things had not gone well for a while for one of his
favorite creatures, this one god dropped him a note that read,
“Hey, it could be worse — I could tell you to get lost — and
mean it.”

* * *

Upon closer examination, even less was happening.

* * *

A tag team of city thinkers about wrapped up certain
modern matters by the following observations — thinker one says:
“There’s more to life than therapy.” And number two adds: “But
not much.”

* * *

Another manner in which you can ascertain the continuing
health of any reality is that things therein begin to try and
speak, which the elders think have no business doing so.

* * *

All facts finally fail, which is part of their proper
function.

* * *