Jan Cox Talk 0823

Certainty Is Surcease for Ordinary Minds

PREVNEXT

Summary = See below
Excursion / Task = See Below
Condensed News Items = See below
News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-01-02 -0823
Transcript = None
Key Words =

Summary

#823 May 31, 1991 – 1:00 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :17. The fanatic is a tangible representative of certainty. The ordinary mind absolutely craves certainty. The fanatic’s world is the same thing over and over again, vs. the ‘if not one thing, it’s another’ of a vibrant, growing world. The fanatical is very short-lived because it is suicidal. Certainty is surcease for ordinary minds.


The News

One man had some occupants who didn’t actually live there.

* * *

In its forced march toward attempted completion, ordinary
criticism could be viewed as a two-thirds-stab at the
analyzation of the new intelligence.

* * *

Not far from where you could’ve lived is a country whose
national anthem is, “Sit Down And Shut Up.”

* * *

At a recent forestry convention I met a chap who at all
times carries with him his own personal Synonym Directory — no,
I don’t mean it’s his personal possession, I mean the book
contains only synonyms for the word “me.”

* * *

Whenever he had problems, this one guy’d call people up.

* * *

Being enigmatic is not difficult if you can’t think
straight to begin with; the problem then is that you confuse
yourself along with everyone else.

* * *

He insists he once had an outlook that was “surprising,” but
says he’s never completely recovered from having seen “history
nude.”

* * *

After years of city therapy and other self-improvement
stuff, this one guy verbally plots his psychological progress by
saying that he has gone from being an accident waiting to happen
to being an accident waiting for people to slow down and stare
at him.

* * *

The day’s advice to one kid from his sore-headed ole man was
this: “If you find you can’t be smart, then act real nice —
then everybody’ll know you ain’t smart.”

* * *

Spotter’s Guide Update: In dimensionally limited realities,
the more civilized areas may be identified by their creatures’
tolerance of physical abuse coupled with their aggressive
resistance to having their ideas pushed around the dance floor.

* * *

From our electronic viewing and listening audience comes
this letter: “Dear Kyroot: Is it possible to have an act that
is itself a direct, cogent comment on the nature of man’s
intellectual reality?” Signed, “Dear Sir.” Well, Dear Sir: Do
you mean besides my failure to respond to this question?

* * *

“You might care to note” department: The king only corrects
the spelling of those whose writing he can read.

* * *

One mid-aged reality told a younger one, hanging around,
“Even if a story ain’t so hot, a real snappy surprise ending
will make up for a lot. Remember that, in case you ever decide
to expand.”

* * *

Over near Two Folks Road was a man who was so good natured
and jolly that he took himself along everywhere he went.

* * *

It is proper to be dissatisfied with the mental efforts of
others, but such are not the sources of a revolutionist’s
intellectual nourishment.

* * *

This one god says he just got into town.

* * *

One fellow says that he’s having such great ideas that
it’s becoming hard to tell them apart… …(He says that’s part
of what makes them so great.)

* * *

If you don’t acknowledge it, it won’t acknowledge you;
(Second Version for those who might feel a bit stronger by now):
If you don’t acknowledge it, it won’t bother you.

* * *

In the hall just outside the family library, one guy stopped
his kid and said, “If you do want to ruminate and ramble about in
history, then look upon it as a video tape in your hands, and not
as an oil painting.”

* * *

Once a month or so, this one man would stand over the
bathroom sink, stare into the mirror, first at his brain, then at
himself, then back to his brain, then back to himself and say,
“Okay, a shampoo, trim and a tease.”

* * *

A certain health-minded king, in a fit of blinding fury
(which in his case ofttimes passed as “Great Insight”) suddenly
saw that without men there could be no mortally transferable
ills. …(I’m not sure much more commentary is necessary;
suffice it to note that no new census was needed the following
year.)

* * *

On this one world everybody’s waiting on a bus.

* * *

From a more complex examination and diagnosis: there can
be no cure for the ills of today in a time-limned reality.
…(Inter-galactic second opinion: Thus, the prudent man is
always sick tomorrow, or last week.)

* * *

Everyone loves a fanatic — even those who don’t like
him.

* * *

One somewhat solitary-type subversive thought, “I’m all in
favor of everyone else getting together and doing the best they
can,” and later one of his brain cells had a copy-cat version of
the notion regarding its own neural neighbors.

* * *

“Listen,” said the big voice of one reality, “I don’t care
if you’re silly, as long as you don’t take it seriously.”

* * *

Then there was this one guy who’d never finish his.

* * *
One rebel confided that some of his greatest intellectual
performances were done near mid-court during over-time. …(Post
Script: He adds that he wanted to say they were done during
time-outs, but he figured you’d believe that even less.)

* * *

Lesson For The Doo-Dah-Day: In human terms the difference
between some and many is sometimes some and other times many.
(Hey — you takin’ notes or is you already from around here?)

* * *

A certain intellectual reality considered issuing a new word
to represent friendship among equals, but a cousin chided him,
noting there was enough unnecessary noise about as it was.

* * *

Contrary to popular Pol-Sci thought, the opposite of control
and restraint is not anarchy, for the plain reason that in
strictly human terms control and restraint have no opposite.
…(In revolutionist details, the operational opposite of
control and restraint would be “fresh thought.”)

* * *

One of the men who hang out over in the city where the men
do gave his view in these words, “When the end comes too soon,
can the middle be far behind.”

* * *

A viewer writes in to ask, “Besides people like me, who
writes all those other Letters From Viewers?”

* * *

He wired up his thinking machine so that when things had not
gone well it would say that it was not feeling all that good; he
does admit this serves no ultimately logical purpose, but points
out that we all ourselves feel better thereby. (I wonder why?)

* * *

Another place has a tale about a man who would travel no
road he did not help pave; the story says even though he did not
go far, he saw more than did all the king’s surveyors and foreign
ambassadors.

* * *

In the early morning hours, after a particularly bad
century, this one god would often mutter to himself, “Jeeze, I
gotta take some time off.”

* * *

The slogan for a vibrant, growing reality could be: “If it
ain’t one thing, it’s another,” while the by-word of a stagnant
one might be: “If it’s one thing, it’s the same thing again and
again.”

* * *

This one guy would sometimes stay up late at night, you
know, just to annoy himself. …(And boy, did it sometimes
work!)

* * *

The life of any idea goes through many stages, but for the
sake of efficiency, men call them by just two names.

* * *

You know, I don’t wanna give you guys the willies or
anything like that, but it is only other people who ever doubt
that I exist.

* * *

One guy drug this dead body behind him everywhere he went.

* * *

One old city grizzler held the kid by the shoulders, faced
him away from the family sorehead homestead and out toward the
world and advised, “Son, as you travel the hand-rails and back
trails of life, you need but two things in your fashionable back
pack: The love of revenge and some antacid tablets; what the
first don’t overcome, the second will make up for.”

* * *

Men who lose their faith without a corresponding
intellectual discovery tend to get real cranky and write poetry.

* * *

A subversive told a younger recruit, “The problem with the
word progress is that it implies a finite goal.”

* * *

From a brief reality that once passed through these parts,
only one bit of history was left: this single sentence (which I
translate for you now…[you do trust me, don’t you?]), well,
the remaining trace says: “It is not who suffers the most or
the least, but a matter of who still whines and cries.”
…(Were they brief enough for you?)

* * *

There’s no way out of a punching bag.

* * *

For city cultural purposes: The shorter the statement, the
longer should be the quotation marks.

* * *

On Fridays on this one planet, over the first couple of
minutes of sunset, its god would “roll the credits.”

* * *

Out of the lot of them, one finally agreed to do it, but
only on certain conditions, which none had intent to honor.

* * *

Official City Announcement (good for any day on which it’s
read or remembered): A person without an extraordinary
intellectual goal in life is either very unhappy, happy, or
somewhere in between.

* * *

One guy tried to have ideas that didn’t deal in specifics
enough to later sound dated.

* * *

The ordinary mind attempting to understand itself through
scientific and poetic reflections on its many quirks, quarks and
sentiments is like a storage shed studying the contents placed
therein in an effort to conceive of its origins.

* * *

One up-and-coming king would only shoot his neighbors
after he’d said, “Good morning, how are you today?” but this
proved to have little effect on subsequent historians; but by
then, he was too famous — and dead to care.

* * *

We’ve just now received a rush-fax from a viewer who says,
“That last Kyroot is entirely exemplary of you wasting our time
with stories and comments that are beyond even the pale of the
irrational…if not the irrelevant…if not the confusing, and
like that. I, for one, don’t want to take it any more, but I
don’t know how to stop. Please advise — and stop it!”

* * *