Jan Cox Talk 1506

Live on the Brink of Disaster–By Choice

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Summary = See below
Condensed News Items = See Below
News Item Gallery = jcap 95111 (1506)
Transcript = None
Key Words =
Rating = FAV

Summary

#1506 – 10/27/95:
Notes by TK

The main thrust of the attempt to expand consciousness is the “know thyself” method which amounts to an attempt to vanquish one self with another self. But only the mental part of man can effect any study and it never recognizes the problem of which self is the proper self to vanquish/study the other.


The News

1506 95111 10/27/95 Copyright J. M. Cox 1995 /tw

95111-1

There was once a man who went everywhere with two friends —
two invisible friends —
I say “invisible” even though one of them was clearly seen
and the other one plainly heard.
And yet, for general intents & purposes, they were invisible in that
only the man himself was generally taken into notable account.

* * *

Even somewhere this side of actually knowing the secret itself,
men still have knowledge of a most unusual nature, that is
they know something quite strange that they can never admit to.

* * *

95111-2,3

Since Adam was driven from the Garden (and made to “think about things”),
he has generally believed he now operates primarily under the auspices of
his mind;
now
(since I placed a semicolon here)
it’s obvious this was not the end of what I had to say regarding the matter,
but, after all we’ve already been through,
is it really necessary for me to complete the story for you?

The true origin of all metaphors is in the blood,
so who but a warrior would ever know this?

95111-4

There was once a group of kids who played hide-&-seek,
and the lad who always won
did so by always hiding in his own head.

“Unfair!” cried the other children who were severely retarded
and covered with instinct spots.

95111-5

One man says that it is hard to live the life of a mystic
while simultaneously living an everyday one,
and he is unaware (I assure you) of the fact that
away in closed monasteries are those who think that it is difficult indeed
to pursue the mystical path while so cut off from everyday life.

You can live in the Himalayas,
or hang out in the Rockies,
but wherever you are,
your stomach’s still going to think that your mind’s a bit touched,
and verse vicey.

* * *

Once,
at the annual Chivalrous Sing Off,
one team of knights sang as their entry this refrain:
“Oh, you can’t get away — no, you’ll never get away.”
Which was countered in the competition by another knightly choir who sang:
“Oh, we’ve got to get away — yes, we must get away.”
Which in turn was greeted by a third band of warriors who musically replied:
“‘Get away? Get away?’ — What the hell is ‘get away’ anyway? —
We’re already home-&-free, which turns out (curious enough) to be us.”

* * *

95111-6

In considering the two realms to which man has access,
the instinctive and the intellectual,
one man pondered:
“Which of these two is the true source of all the ‘bad news’ men seem to
sense?”

(As we wait for him to think on this, would you like to go ahead and
answer?”

95111-7

If tying fluffy tails on rats
makes them seem more like agreeable little squirrels,
then what d’ya have to say about how the mind dresses up certain ideas
so’s to make ’em presentable to take home to mama?

‘Tis only ulcerated intellects that believe certain foods are more
naturally discomforting that others.

Muhammad (disguised as the head pastry chef) said:
“Just sprinkle some sugar on it,
and they’ll never notice whether it’s a vinegar pie or their mother’s
corset.”

95111-8

To help keep the secret from man,
life has arranged his mind so that, whenever it hears anything that’s
getting too close to the subject,
it translates it into being some mundane, irrelevant criticism of life
itself.

Is it any wonder that the human mind can protect itself so well? —
Just look at who it has as a teacher.

* * *

95111-9

To try and get even,
one man began describing mystics as:
“men who make up strange little stories to entertain certain other
passengers on the routine Train Of Life.”
…(And he adds: “Don’t sound so impressive now, do they?”)

95111-10

A Brief Anecdote Regarding The Indigenous, Humble Nature Of
Man’s Intellectual Processes

In a upbeat mood one day, a man said to his mind:
“I’m lucky to have you.”
To which his mind replied:
“Then I am twice lucky for I have you and me.”

Twenty-First Century Progress Report:
Both instinct and intellect can still be non-unassuming in their
own, necessary ways.

* * *

95111-11

According to the claims of a certain telescope,
there are not only worlds responsible for the proper, universal production
of all of man’s myths, legends, and allegories,
but also unseen ones charged with mangling and abusing them.

Can you still be in wonder that the longer a true knight travels,
the more does his crumbling hearing aid go unattended to?

* * *

On Earth was once a man who demanded,
“Let me out of here! — I must get out of here!”
to which his very skin replied,
“Are you talking to me?”
…(And after that: Can you still be in doubt about anything that
you should have ignored in the first place?)

* * *

95111-12

In the beginning, men loved the idea of there being a secret to be
discovered — but that got so spooky that they renamed it
and began to refer to it as something sacred and unknowable.

If there is one thing that instinct and the mind have in common,
it is their inborn impulse to always take the easy way out.
…(What the hell do you think survival’s all about anyway?)

…But wait up! —
if that be so,
then just what the hell is it that mystics are up to regarding the mind?
…(Now that’s spooky!)

* * *

95111-13

A Brief But Comprehensive Overview Of The Normal Operations Of
The Human Intellect

After finding the two-billion-and-twenty-seventh dog hair in his food,
one man came to the immediate suspicion that he might have a dog.

* * *

Once, in an alternative reality to ours,
there was a parade, a most marvelous parade,
but a parade that could only move forward if it did not know where it was
going.

* * *

95111-14

There was once a man whose personal, mental motto was “I-I-I think not!”

“Hey,” he said, “no conclusion intended.”
“Hey,” he replied, “none taken.”

* * *

Only ordinary people can be driven crazy —
which is why ordinary people are sane to begin with.

“Daddy, who were we to begin with?”
— But the old man did not reply.

* * *

95111-15

Yet Another Trick That Life (Or Somebody) Is Playing On Man

Those of ordinary mind who may speak of a dual nature to man
always do so in the context of their observation being one of
criticism and condemnation.

* * *

Once upon a faraway place & time
was this really silly planet,
on which were these native-born beings who were absolutely certain that
they did not belong there
and were not who they were.

Then there was yet this other parade
which could only go where it was not wanted.
…(The operational motto here being “Progress Makes Perfect.”)

* * *

95111-16

The speaker proclaimed: “It’s all in the blood.”
And someone in the crowd replied: “Well, obviously the biology of our
hormones is, but what about the psychology of our neurons?”
And the speaker declared: “They are there also.”
And the voice from the crowd replied: “But how can that be?”
And the speaker said: “Don’t ask me.”
Which seemed to satisfy all concerned.

– – –

Question: Why do cows like to hang out in herds,
and sheep gather in flocks,
and wolves live in packs,
and lions run in prides,
and humans stand so close together mentally
that they all become just one big blur?

* * *

There was once a genie who knew the secret way out of the bottle,
but to keep if from falling into unwashed hands, he hid it…well,
he wanted to hide it, but the question was “where?”
(the world of the bottle being so small and all),
and then he finally hit upon it: He stashed the secret to the way out
in the breath of all confined…and everything worked out fine.

* * *

95111-17,18

To instinct — there is nothing sacred but survival;
to the mind — a similar situation, but to which it is generally blind.

There was once a mystery school whose principal method was that
whatever thoughts were passing through a student’s mind,
he was to mentally say to himself (using his own name):
“It is I, Nicoli Stossi, having these thoughts in Nicoli’s head.”
And after passing through this stage
they would move to repeating the idea as applied to their entire body,
and once successful at that, would say the words to themselves about the
thoughts they were having, but this time, rather than referring to them as
being experienced in one’s head or throughout one’s body,
the student would say to himself that the thoughts were but a part of
the entirety of life, of which he was but sampling a small part.

95111-19

To want to know the secret is a serious matter indeed,
but to go about doing it — not.

Oh you can — trip on your tongue,
and you can trip on your feet,
but you can mostly trip on your tongue.

* * *

95111-20

The Colossal Conundrum as proposed by one knightly order:
“To change the flow of thought
is to change the flow of blood —
which initially directs the flow of thought.”

95111-21

To try and keep himself reminded of the two worlds within him of
instinct and intellect,
one man stuck a squirrel down in his pants
and put a parrot on his head.
…Folks — are we talkin’ serious apropos-ness here, or what?

95111-22

To try and get even for being so mechanically talkative, one man bit his
tongue — then cried out in response: “Oww! dammit!”

Although the price of revenge continues to rise,
so too does man’s ability to pay.
…(In fact, from hence came the phrase “chump change.”)

* * *

There was once a land in which on alternate days you were permitted to first
laugh at other people’s looks,
then at their ideas,
then back to their looks,
then again at their ideas, and so on,
during that break between the end of football season and the beginning of
baseball.

* * *

95111-23

If the history of this reality is X trillion years old,
and the history of this universe is Y billion years,
and the history of man Z million,
and the history of thinking man several thousand,
then how long do you suppose it might be before super thinkers show up
and see how to trace this cosmic history through blood?

* * *

On a certain world,
in a certain galaxy,
in a certain universe
were once some creatures whose aversion to the sight of blood was such
that they concocted a whole new realm of “imaginary reality”
which they christened: “The Sacred & Unseeable.”
…(For as even the simplest among us know,
if you don’t look at something, it can’t frighten you.)

* * *

There was once a seeker of things mystical who worked at it so hard that
life finally took notice of him, and as a reward for his efforts gave him
his choice of either meeting a real, live mystic or of forgetting that he
ever believed they actually existed.

95111-24

Self-reference is the preferred, civilized manner of
admitting to one’s dual nature.

…(Which is, of course,
why you so seldom hear beavers talk about themselves…much.)

* * *

95111-25

The ordinary believe that the most important thing regarding the mind is to
cure it of its problems
…same as how an idiot thinks he should take a shower and
put on his best clothes before getting in his bed.

In one land men were secretly discouraged from becoming knights
by the simple act of setting up a clinic whose declared purpose was
“The Free Treatment Of All Knightly Ills.”

What better way to keep the tourists out of Istanbul
than to tell them that one of the wheels on their train is cracked
and must be seen to if the journey is to succeed.

* * *

A viewer writes: “Why do you speak so much more about the mind
than you do instinct?” …Sir, what do you think that is now,
swirling all around you?
…Oh, I don’t know — the window in this car is so grimy that it’s
hard to see out and tell.

95111-26

As one man began exploring his newly discovered territories,
he found that the simple natives already there referred to him as
“he who speaks with forked tongue,”
and was greatly surprised at the depth of their biological-based
understanding.

95111-27

The actual purpose of the brainstem in man was to
serve as a way station on the ride between Frank and Jessie James’ places.

95111-28

If the muscles and tendons of instinct are habit,
then what should maybe be the strength of the intellect?

* * *

One man (as he walked through life) talked to himself.
This man (it might be noted) did not go far.

* * *

95111-29

In the beginning, all would-be mystics want a miraculous, instant method
for awakening and enlightenment —
and what’s sort of perversely chuckle-fying is that,
way on down the line,
most of them are still waiting on it.

95111-30

There was once a knight who, on his journey, had a secret word to remember,
but as his adventure progressed
he came upon having a secret word to never think about.

Routine men’s notions of certain things being sacred
and demanding of inviolate reverence
have all arisen from certain misunderstandings.

* * *

One transcendental music lover noted:
“I may not be able to define ‘soulless’ but I know it when I hear it.”

* * *

95111-31,32

An intern at a certain mythical medical school began to muse unto himself:
“Regarding the possible pathology of the mind,
would I prefer to suffer from hyperthought or from hypothought?…
overdo it, or underdo it?…”
The elder surgeon leading rounds the following Thursday
found the idea of “possible pathology of the mind” smile provoking,
and the notion of either “over- or underdoing thought”
a down-right thigh slapper
(so much so in fact that he ended up walking with a limp for most of the
day).

The super of one building sent around a note to all tenants
asking them if they’d prefer to let those living on the lower floors
be in charge of being sick
or give the honor to those living upstairs.

* * *

Acting in his official capacity as the head of The Department Of Neurology,
he issued the following statement:
“The normal human mind consists of 88% bullshit
with the remaining 12% being made up of additional bull hockey.”

* * *

As he listened to the news being read one night, a man said to himself:
“You know, it has a certain rhythm to it —
a certain, extremely annoying rhythm!”

* * *

95111-33

To try and get even for all the ills inflicted on it by men,
life decided to do nothing to them other than was already being done.

* * *

To try and get even for all of the harm it had suffered at the hands of man,
life said it was going to do nothing
since the whole thing was simply a gigantic illusion to begin with.

* * *

95111-34

One man had what he thought of as “a curious little experience”
in attempting to trap a certain wild animal that was bothering him at night
by its rummaging around in his back yard;
he set out a trap cage, baited with the beast’s known favorite food,
but found, in spite of its observable, strong desire to get to it,
the animal was too dumb to find its way into the open end of the trap.

…But, as he was shaking his head is disbelief,
he thought for a moment that he saw the creature look his way and say:
“If you think this is something,
get a load of you trying to approach new ideas.”
But he immediately rattled his head even more vigorously
and shook the silly notion smartly from his mind.

If men didn’t have dumb animals to feel superior to, they’d a’had to invent
them…. Doubt it? — just take a glance downward, where you stand right
now.

95111-35

There was once a world-class mystic (of whom history does not speak)
who started out his journey as a comedian (although not going by that name),
but as he for so long traveled through the Lands Of Seriousness
he began to eventually “lose his edge”
and had to alter his approach.

Midlife career changes can certainly play havoc with a man’s mind!
(“Thank god!” adds the mystic.)

95111-36

A Certain Unexpected (Albeit Extra-Dimensional) Progression

The simple speak dogmatically;
the more sophisticated attempt to sound knowingly vague,
while those most mechanically complex want their words to be heard as being
insightfully speculative and intentionally ambiguous.
Then we get to the more-conscious who speak (or at least think)
dogmatically.

* * *

95111-37

In a certain dull and stagnant kingdom,
it was a real accomplishment to learn to count up to two,
and although there were tales of some having gone as high as three — even
four — they always vanished after doing so…apparently.

* * *

One legend says that when life drove Adam from the initial garden,
as compensation it told him a great secret,
so great in fact that Adam forthwith forgot it.

…(Note: The popular, current catch-phrase — to “blow your mind” —
is not as new as the civilians believe.)

* * *

95111-38

To try and get even with physical instinct,
the mind of one man decided to become even more thoughtful than it already
was.
…(And from way down below was heard the mournful cry:
“Oh no, Mister Bill — please-e-e — not that!”)

95111-39

Addendum To The General Handbook Of Civilization

In a better world: Nothing will be anyone’s fault.
…(Of course, in the present one, seen better, nothing is already.)

“Attention, all mystics: Please do not stand in front of civilians
and interfere with their normal line of sight.”

* * *

95111-40

The first secret of all things is in its blood;
the next, in its thoughts,
and the one after that — The Secret itself.

95111-41

Another Test To Separate Potentially Real Mystics From The Dilettantes

You can drive amateurs nuts.

– – –

After a careful weighing of the above information,
a young lad, interested in such matters, shuddered and asked his father:
“Do you realize, regarding mystics, what this then implies?”
And his father replied: “Well…no….”

…(Hey! the old codger didn’t get that old
by lettin’ people drive him crazy.)

* * *

95111-42

A viewer writes:
“Would you repeat what you recently said about how a mystic can tell that
‘he’s beginning to lose it’
when, to him, the truth starts to sound redundant?”
…Well, sir — what d’you think?

95111-43

The truly successful warrior is one who lives forever on the brink of
disaster.

Note: Things not intentionally done are never truly done,
nor in any way successful to the few-who-know.

95111-44

Without self-reference, the ordinary mind cannot exist
…so what’s a mystic’s excuse? — Huh-h-h?

95111-45

Consider the possibility that a preeminent purpose of all thought is simply
self-perpetuation.

95111-46

While strolling along the streets of a new city,
a man heard a voice call to him from a dark alleyway with the offer:
“Pst! — dirty pictures? — dirty pictures for the mind?”
And he was suddenly refreshed anew to realize again just how far he’d come.