Jan Cox Talk 1003

Self-reference Is the Blood Pressure of Secondary Level Systems

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Summary = See below
Condensed News Items = See below
News Item Gallery = jcap 92083 -1003
Transcript = None
Key Words =

Summary

#1003 Jul 27, 1992 – 1:00 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :25. Self-reference is the blood pressure of SL (Secondary Level) systems. The Secondary Level World feeds upon itself; a bootstrap operation. 

Talk about emotions helps magnify them. 

A “fountain of youth” would be the ability to have compassion for the system.


The News

…and Kyroot said: 92083-(#)
Copyright 1992 J. M. Cox [1003]

A two eyed man in a three-D world is, intellectually
speaking, functionally blind.

***

A man with lots of modifiers has a lot of explaining to do.

***

A man whose allegiance is to some form external, such as his
nation, race, or religion, does well in his actions in that he
needs all the help he can muster.

***

The routine intellectual progress of man consists of a game
of intellectual leap frog.

***

Self-reference is the blood pressure of secondary systems.

***

Those with personal theories to explain the behavior of
others are in pressing need of one for themselves.

***

All self-complimentary, “respect for others” must be for
others who are dead.

***

Compared to more complex neural activities, just to get by
nicely over in the city, it doesn’t even take a rocket scientist
to be a rocket scientist.

***

…and Kyroot noted: The impaired seldom appreciate being
told they’re impaired — if it’s done for free — and it comes
from anyone other than their own impaired physician.

***

A rebelliously involved lad asked his dad: “While doing
this, is there anything you can think about that is as useless as
thinking about death?” And the ole man replied, “Relationships
will run a close second.”

***
…and Kyroot noted: A man apparently weighted down with
the burden of history, and a lack of originality, climbed wearily
atop a short soapbox in the park and addressed the crowd:
“Friends, Romans, and countrymen: Lend me your speech writers.”

***

One man told his partner: “A man with sores can run
faster.” And his other self asked: “Does that mean we should
develop some?” And he replied, “Not necessary.”

…..once he’d tripped and began careening perilously down the
ravine, he thought as he rolled: “Bad feet (amongst other
things): Sign of a life well spent.”

***

For talk to be serious you’ve got to make it serious.
(Collective Version: For the secondary world to exist it must
have secondary world supporters and slaves.)

***

…and an urban transit worker noted: “Even without a
ticket, being disoriented can get you standing room on a bus.”

***

The king mused: “It’s good for the dense to be some-times-
drunk; it gives them the some-times-illusion of having some
control.” (To a rebel’s mind, the illusion of freedom is worse
than no freedom at all.)

***

One city said: “You can take it personally, or not take it
personally, but if you’re going to live around here you’re going
to take it personally.”

***

The Two Brat Brothers spent their day thusly: First they
took turns sticking their tongues out at each other; then they
did it simultaneously; then they stuck ’em out at all their city
friends and enemies; then they turned, and in unison, stuck their
tongues out at you. (They said “You’d know what it means” – ? –
! – ?)

***

To make things come out even in his peculiar, personal
affairs, one man has deleted the number six from all his
calculations.

***

A man writes the Advice Doctor: “Dear Doctor: Should I be
concerned: My nervous system is beginning to really resemble me
(or vice versa); is there cause for concern? Yours,” etc.

***

Notice sent out to all of the Mental Health Practitioners of
one city: “Be on guard: Some will volunteer to accept the blame
just to keep you from putting it on them. Don’t be fooled! —
but even if you are — so what?!” One young roustabout said:
“The neat thing about working on the Funny Farm is that I don’t
have far to drive to get to work.”

***

One chap traces his cerebral, celluloid career thusly: “I
began as, ‘The Horrendous Creature From The Black Basement,’ and
worked my way up to the lead in, ‘The Horrendous Creature From
The Third Floor.’”

***

The Company Clerk told the assembled troops: “Those with
large organs may apply for ‘Large Organ Holsters’.” (Would that
the intellectual world was so obliging to would-be thinkers.)

***

One man decided to save himself a whole lot of time by
climbing the tallest building in town, and swatting at passing
planes while he roared and declared — “I am civilization!”

***

For a rebel’s purposes; mental attacks on others are just a
non-prohibited form of deadly assault; “deadly” as in suicidal —
not homicidal.

***

An ole man said to a potentially rebellious and creative
kid: “If you are going to try and do this revolution thing start
now and do as much as you can early, or else when you get to be
fifty or sixty, and seem to be more tolerant and insightful, you
can’t be sure whether it’s from increased understanding, or just
the weariness of age.”

***

To help illustrate, the voice of progress said: “Man was
not meant to just eat, sleep and procreate, but to play baseball,
and go watch it played.” (The word from progress.)

***

…then Kyroot noted the Secondary World’s Operational
Judgement: “Man’s systems are far too complicated and promising
not to be talked about.”

***

As others discussed physical flaws they thought made them
unattractive, one man reflected on his mind and mused:
“It is my chemistries
That cause my blimishtries.”

***

The Metaphor Man said: “My profession is bricklayer, and my
hands are mudboys; this should locate my mind to a specific
related position of responsibility, but it doesn’t seem to have
happened yet.” …(“Just think,” noted his grammar school
principal, “if roofers could do a pas de chat then we’d have
people in tights and little funny skirts atop our houses.”)

***

Yet, one more man’s description of the matter: “Having
heroes is climbing a ladder after them, forever condemned to
stare at someone else’s ass.” (Not knowing all the possible uses
of thought, men gather together and ask one another, “What do you
think?” And on-it-goes.)

***

Once men become civilized and safe from primary’s harm,
their main source of suffering then becomes each other. (Several
people thought about this and declared, “We don’t like it.” The
Hallmark company, on the other hand, announced, “We just love
it.” …[In a finite environment, despondency, even suicide,
will turn a buck’s profit for someone.])

***

If man’s attention to important matters could be held for
briefer periods, religions could be funnier and shorter.

***

And from somewhere — this serious update: The revolution:
The ultimate hobby. …No!, seriously: The revolution: The
ultimate, supreme hobby. …No, no!, I mean seriously now!: The
revolution: The ultimate, supreme, paramount, preeminent, once-
and-for-all hobby. …That’s more like it.

***

Seditious neural hint disguised as Legal Advice: You can’t
sue a pronoun. …(And a little kid squealed, “Oh daddy, daddy,
when I grow up can I be one?!”)

…..But, just then a viewer quickly inserted himself to say:
“Hold on there just a blooming minute!: Just what do you think
would happen to me if I treated myself like some bloody
‘pronoun’?!”

***

Intellectual battle tip for those beyond a routine trip:
Neither fleas, nor whales take prisoners. (And the little fish
chorus gurgled in:
“Think big,
Think small;
Think a lot, or
Not at all.

Be chilled,
Or overwrought;
But don’t be plain or
You’ll be caught.”)

***

One rebel’s personal motto: “To explain yourself is to lame
yourself.”

***

Bouncing back and forth between the gymnasium and the bus
station, the man finally thought: “You can put your overnight
locker in any name you want to if you’re just going to die any
way.”

***

And yet another letter into the Advice Doctor: “Dear
Doctor: When watching the Kyroot Show sometimes I feel like my
circuits are overloading.” And the Doctor replies: “Perhaps you
started with too small a juncture box.”

***

The vice mayor of one polar-based city told a young
assistant: “There’s some good in even the worst of us; why after
all, even men with lower back problems get invited to, ‘The Men
With Lower Back Problems Annual Picnic’.” …(“Uuuu!”, shuddered
a city hall pigeon out on a ledge who heard this, “just think
what’d happen if men’s spiritual institutions adopted such a
position. Uhhh!”, he shuddered.)

***

Talk about emotions helps magnify them.

***

Kyroot’s Cultural Updaty: Everyone in show business
believes they have a mission; everyone who believes they have a
mission is in show business; periodically even those in the
audience arouse themselves long enough to say, “Hey, call my
agent, and if I don’t have one — get me one.” Then it all
lapses back to choreographed normalcy.

***

…then Kyroot admitted (if that’s the word for it):
Ordinary thinking will keep you alive as long as anything else.

***

The past speaks a foreign tongue, and it is contemporary
history’s continuing job to try and translate it. (By-the-by: I
hear that some rebels, in this regard have said, “Thanks, but
don’t go to all the bother just for me.”)

***

“Okay,” said some more experienced neurons to some younger
ones, “let us tell you how things work over in the city: If you
smell bad — wear a loud shirt.”

…..and a viewer writes: “Does that last Kyroot actually have
anything to do with why some men like to brandish tumors?”

***

When this one local god had gotten good enough at the job to
be allowed to pick out his own name, he said, “Just call me, ‘A
Little Something For Everybody’.”

***

…and Kyroot remarked: There are the sophisticated in the
city who say, “Education makes us what we are,” who aren’t yet
struck curious by who it is who designs and discharges their
schools.

***

One man said: “Talking about people is a cheap way of
dealing with them.” And his brother added: “But not dealing
with them is cheaper still.”

***

And Kyroot offered up another of the interesting, curious
curlicues regarding this sort of stuff: A revolution “with a
mission” skates on suicidal ice.

***

And believe it or not, still a third person writes to the
Advice Doctor this time around (though the Doctor says this isn’t
the first time more than two people have contacted him in one
day), but nevertheless, this third correspondent has this to say:
“I watch the Kyroot show and enjoy it a lot, but when the second
guy comes on to expound on the Kyroots, I’ve begun to wonder if
his enthusiasm and passion is just a pretense. I’ve also just
instantly decided that if you know — I don’t want to know after
all.”

***

As he left the store with his new wheelbarrow, this one man
stopped long enough to say this: “You can tell the value most
people place on their thinking by that nice plastic siding they
put up to protect it.”

***

One mutinous mother told the kid: “Believing that people
operate on principles is like believing trains choose to run on
tracks.”

…..After getting some “breathing room” past adulthood, this
one young man decided: “The ’Live-and-learn’ process is far too
expensive for my tastes.”

***

The way ordinary minds do it, thinking is like attending the
prize fights (although a few do try to work crossword puzzles
while there); but what a revolutionist wants (as long as he has
to be in the vicinity), is to not only enjoy the slugfest, but
also to visit a museum, go to a concert, stop for a fresh verbal-
tossed salad, and get chummy enough with the promoters to
discover the real, backstage, fixed-nature of the whole affair.

***

One guy got so good at a new kind of really fast thinking
that sometimes his mind would say, “Could you hold it just a
second! — I’d like to say something!”

***
.pa
…then Kyroot, after showing his Captain Obvious Fan Club
membership card, said: The best drugs for the mind are the drugs
produced by the mind. …(“Yeah, may be, but who cares?!”, says
one guy, “since you can’t buy ’em at the package store down the
street, and since they’re not prohibited! — who cares?!!!”,
repeats he.)

***

A kid asked his ole man: “Has there ever been a love
affair, a religion, or a mutual fund that didn’t mention death?!”
The nature of secondary speech-though is such that the first
thing the beginning of a sentence thinks about is how it will
end. (Efficient for some matters — not so with others.)

***

…and Kyroot relayed: One rebel’s advice: Don’t dance
with those who want to talk about it while doing it.

***

While out for a stroll one man suddenly — without an
observable script or prompting — said to himself: “In ordinary
life everything is a cheap substitute.” And after a couple of
steps replied: “But at least it’s affordable.”

***

If language is the most seductive of the arts, then thought
is the most erotic of the sciences.

***

After intellectual maturity, men’s prime pleasure on the
train is sitting in seats already well contoured by previous
passengers.

***

…and Kyroot noted: If there is a Fountain Of Youth it
would be in “compassion for the system.”

***

One man says he’s figured out his own hierarchy of certain
matters; he says he figures: “When god’s out of town the king’s
in charge; and when the king’s out of town I’m in charge; and I’m
always out of town, so there.”

***

Any headstone marking a rebel’s death was not erected by his
instructions.

***

You can always tell when the secondary world is struggling
to make a measurable move ahead: First there’ll be a bombastic,
“von Suppe” style overture, quickly followed by a rousing
denunciation of all such Viennese composers, often culminating in
an on-stage execution of Herr Suppe’. After that things will sort
of settle down for a bit, and then maybe move along the lines
initially hinted at in the opening theme…and maybe not. In the
city, a man with a city mind and a city view confessed:
“Progress is hard to track down when all you have to go by is
you.”

***

Standing on the corner of Third and Candor a man said, “I am
not personally much impressed with any food chain of which I am a
part.”

***

To accept the thoughts of others as the supreme joy is to
forbear intellectual hairy-palms as de rigueur.

***

Instead of a short, autobiographical sketch, as the teacher
requested, one kid handed in a rabid squirrel.

***

Two realities were sitting in an outdoor cafe drinking fancy
mineral water and watching girls go by, and one of them said:
“You know, it’d seem that once thinking creatures became
civilized and got free of the primary world’s immediate physical
dangers, that they’d lose interest in notions of religions.” And
his bud took a sip and responded, “You’re not giving it your full
attention, for truth still be that so long as they unknowingly
use the idea of the ‘spiritual’ as one synonym for ‘thinking’
such supernatural belief systems will survive and thrive.”
…(“Wow!”, said the other one, “did you see the wa-zoo-kies
on that babe!”) In case you’ve never thought about it; life can
be as sexist, chauvinistic, and racist as it wants to be — since
it can’t be. …(Only the suicidal can disdain its own parts and
processes, and by dint of its very name, life is no such
creature.)

***

To ordinary minds, the rebel’s short-cuts and short-circuits
seem not only somehow impossible, but more than that —
unnecessary.

***

One rebel told his son, “All ordinary information is
propaganda; from where it comes is your job to find out.”

***

To the noisy the quiet can appear dangerous (or at least
insulting).

***

The cells not ready to die will not weep for you, nor
officiate at your funeral; they are already gone — off, on their
way to tomorrow.

***

A description from afar: The revolution is like a delicate
pirouette about a dead body.

<END>