Jan Cox Talk 0833

Impossible to Stare in Real Time

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Summary = See below
Condensed News Items = See below
News Item Gallery = jcap 1991-01-25 -0833
Transcript = None
Key Words =

Summary

#833 Jun 24, 1991 – 1:00 
Notes by TK

Kyroot to :17. Non-polarized thought thinking in “real time’ i.e., non-tense-related thinking. Worry-, complaint-based thought is always in a time context. Time is always ordinarily divided up into the past, the possible (present) and the future. The prime area of Real Revolutionist application: the possible-present since only it is non-time related (non-worry-complaint related). It’s impossible to stare and think in real time.

Men are either: living, thinking or thinking about living. Thinking in real time is to do all three simultaneously. It is the extraordinary ability to be aware of the connectedness of it all. The ordinary mind thinks “out of synch” with division from the present.


The News

After vociferously insisting that “Everyone must come to
grips with something,” over the weekend he attached a monkey
wrench to his brain and lips.

* * *

Maps that aren’t outdated are too flat for city eyes.

* * *

The cards he was handing out read: “Being Depressed Is Like
Having Wrinkled Clothes.”

* * *

Conversational Fragment Ninety-Four: “Jeeze — you just
gottaù be the smartest man alive.” (Response): “Jeeze — pleaseù
don’t tell me that!”

* * *

There’s no way that two men can ever be as funny as three.

* * *

If practice makes perfect, how come there’re no statues of
Repetition?

* * *

There are no earthquakes in the factual world.

* * *

Another item from one of the city papers: While the
fireman’s union was raising money for those left homeless by
fires by holding an outdoor barbecue next to the fire station, a
strong wind suddenly came up and the Dow Jones rose by forty-
seven points. …(Even irony has its limits.)

* * *

Although he says we may scoff, this one chap insists he
recently had an NLE — a Near Life Experience.

* * *

One guy would only ask about stuff he wasn’t interested in,
and a chap at the next table said, “Yeah, when I was like that, I
almost married myself.”

* * *

they condemned the universe.

* * *

This one general directed that all the troops on the front
lines should always take plenty of time to discuss, plan and
debate before ever taking any offensive or defensive action — to
just take all the time they wanted. …(In four out of the last
five years they have been awarded the prize of Biggest Losers
Possible As Seen From A Certain Angle.)

* * *

Information from the City Files: “The less you eat, the
more you sleep.” …(Unless, of course, as in some many other
areas, you do it normally, and have it backwards. …[It’s
hard to say whether all of the above is in quotes, or just the
first sentence.])

* * *

And the ole man bellowed, “If you waste your time nowù havin’
fun, what’ll you do later?!”

* * *

You can forget science fiction dreams — talk is the real
time machine.

* * *

One tale continues to tell of a reality that would not
accept any new king who was not lame, bloodied, and blind in at
least one eye. (They say it’s a matter of credentials.)

* * *

There is a jolly misfortune for those who fall into their
own hands.

* * *

During the ten o’clock coffee break, this one god confided
to a secretary, “If I wereù to ever write a book, I can tell you
this — it wouldn’t have an index.”

* * *

In cautioning himself to take it easy, this one guy would
remind his mind, “Hey, once you feel better, you gotta do
better.”

* * *
A chap who watches our show writes and says that after
considering what he’s heard here for a while he is more and more
pleased — andù relieved to hear me say that there areù other
realities around. (He says he’s in no way become frightened or
pessimistic, but is just somehow gladù to hear about other basic
possibilities.)

* * *

Sometimes they would schedule one program right after
another.

* * *

Hey, another one from the department of Hey-Justice-Ain’t-
Missing-And-Don’t-Call-Captain-Irony: If you ain’t got special
problems, you can’t get special attention; and if you do have
special problems, you won’t get any special attention.

* * *

This one chap would ofttimes leave home just so he could
return again. (A guy down the street says he stole the idea from
him.)

* * *

Believing his family’s diet to be deficient in fiber and
calcium, each morning this one man would leap from behind a
curtain toward his brood at the breakfast table, waving a pointy
shellacked stick and shouting, “Trojans we are no more.”
…(Now all seems well in the home at 429 East Sycamore Lane.)

* * *

The neural revolutionist whose feeling toward the many
variations of human thought is not one of “How cute,” is wayù
behind in his revolutioning.

* * *

One king decided that everyone should call him “Old Blood
And Guts”; the queen continued to call him “Old Tea And
Biscuits,” but she — by god — was the only one.

* * *

Right at the height of the storm, this one man said that in
contradistinction to the more complex reports, he thought that
being ordinary was the best revenge in some cases.

* * *

with infinity, while his brother thought that playing with
yourself is more fun. …(Who? Who, I ask you, would wanna
take sides in this kinda intramural argument.)

* * *

There was once a young lad, in a young time, at a young
place, who found that some of what he had been told matched his
experience and some did not. He was so intrigued with this that
he named it — he called the whole affair “my life.”

* * *

In the city, on certain days, everyùthing’s blown out of
proportion — so what!

* * *

The climax and culmination of one guy’s life was to be
contained in the book he set out to write, “Words To The Wise,”
until he realized he didn’t knowù any who were wise, and even if
he did, he didn’t have any words for them.

* * *

One of the older warriors wiped away some blood and joy and
told several of the younger rebels cleaning up the battlefield,
“If a man does not kill the past, then the past will kill the
man.”

* * *

Turns out he was more fun in person than he was in private.

* * *

At the long front table just inside the Reading Room at the
city library, a voice noted, “No one can be as sad as a poet.”
Then replied another, “And none deserve it more.”

* * *

A viewer writes in and asks if we’re aware of how often
poets are presently in a “bad light”? He says he can’t tell
whether this is done intentionally or is just some subconscious
hostility arising. He says he has no particular interest in this
matter and no personal axe to grind, but just wonders if we’re
aware of this so frequently occurring. …(He included a copy of
his latest book of verse.)

* * *

to himself, “I knew it was too good to last.”

* * *

The extent of his philosophy, he says, is contained in the
following idea (says he), “I sometimes suspect that the sun
continues to arise in the east simply because that is now what is
expected of it.”

* * *

If you can look aroundù and simultaneously be concerned about
how you look — then, then, then, ole friend, you don’t know how
to correctly look around.

* * *

Portions from the continuing city script: “Everyone is
generic.” “Did he say genetic?” “Everyone is genetic.”
“Pardon, but did he say generic?” “Everyone is in the next act
— places, everyone…”

* * *

Okay, I’ll tell you: The typical half-life of the average
intellectual fact is — Oops! Too late.

* * *

A reasonable chap said to a subversive sort, “You sure can
be vague,” and he explained, “Yeah, I know, but I’m being as
vague as I can.” …(The reasonable guy didn’t want to think
about it.)

* * *

And yet another viewer writes to say that if I don’t quit
“picking on” humans in general, he’s going to quit watching our
show. …(And he says, “Oh yeah, I don’t have any personal axe
to grind, either.”)

* * *

Over, above and beyond it all: The appearance of things is
a factual certainty that they have an appearance.

* * *

The ruler of one neural kingdom would officially kick off
each new year with these words: “We would like to express our
deepest gratitude to those already dead for having died — (and
you thoughts know who you are).”

* * *
To test the limits of his intellectual strength, one chap
has offered his services as a composer of “original cliches.”

* * *

One ole guy (who was actually gettingù rather old) pulled his
middle-aged son aside and said, “I might as well tell you now:
When you get old, you’re supposed to actù old. …Oh, I don’t
mean stop turning back-flips and standing on your head, I mean
that intellectually, your ideas should settle down and quit
acting up. …That’s what they’re supposedù to do — at least,
that’s what the city told me, and now I’m telling you; that’s
what you’re supposed to do.”

* * *

In the factual world, nothing can exist until it can be
measured. (Tell thatù to thoughts next time you hear them bad
mouthin’ the limitations of words.)

* * *

One fellow stated, “The easier it is to understand, the
easier it is to forget,” and his partner added, “Thank god.”

* * *

If you’re dissatisfied with anyone else — no matter who
they are — you may as well consider them an enemy, since a foe
could never do you any worse.

* * *

A man who had lived in the city long enough to apparently
know what he was talking about had this to say: “Around here, if
all you knew was actually what you knewù — you wouldn’t know
much.”

* * *

When a civilized man becomes troubled by some primary act
native to man, he often comes to realize that god, too, had
reservations in this matter.

* * *

One man says that he’s studied astronomy, zoology, physics,
anatomy, and geology and the weirdest thing he’s ever encountered
is still the human mind. …(On about the fourth time he said
this, a voice deep inside his room said, “Okay, Buster, you’re
just askingù for it.”)

* * *
What tends to pass for intellectual advancement in the
ordinary world is to go from criticising nouns to critiquing
verbs.

* * *

One of the staffers over at God Headquarters feared that the
end couldù be near when he heard the Big Guy howling and screaming
and raising a bloody ruckus that shook the very foundations of
their reality and found out it was all because of a paper cut
he’d got.

* * *

A call just came in from a viewer who wants to know if I’m
not going to point out that the previous Kyroot should not be
thought of as some metaphorical comment on the internal workings
of an individual man? Sir, it’s not necessary.

* * *

A brief outline of the Development Of Man’s Intellectual
World: The scientist writes about the increasing cold; the poet
writes about how heù has the sniffles; the novelist writes about
how the influenza is being spread by social customs; the
psychologist writes about the possible psychosomatic aspects of
the epidemic, and the churchman writes about how it is all a
well-deserved curse from god. …(Only a neural revolutionist
reads all the papers, subscribes to none, and finds them all
equally cute, informative, and entertaining.)

* * *